White House outlines travel rules for Trump Cabinet members

White House outlines travel rules for Trump Cabinet members
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The White House issued a memo to members of President Trump's Cabinet on Friday outlining rules for travel after the president's health secretary Tom PriceThomas (Tom) Edmunds PriceOvernight Health Care: House GOP considers adding health measures to funding bill | WH doctor says Trump in 'excellent' health | Gallup: Number of uninsured up 3M in 2017 | CDC chief to miss fourth hearing New watchdog group targets Trump HHS on reproductive health EPA inspector general further expands probe into Pruitt travel MORE resigned following backlash over his use of private jets for official business.

"Government-owned, rented, leased, or chartered aircraft should not be used for travel by Government employees, except with specific justification - per the Office of Management and Budget," Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyOvernight Finance: Lawmakers see shutdown odds rising | Trump calls for looser rules for bank loans | Consumer bureau moves to revise payday lending rule | Trump warns China on trade deficit Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule MORE, the director of the office, wrote in the memo dated Friday.

"Every penny we spend comes from the taxpayer. We thus owe it to the taxpayer to work as hard managing that money wisely as the taxpayer must do to earn it in the first place," he continued. 

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Department and agency heads traveling on government-owned or leased planes or chartered aircraft for trips outside their official "mission requirement" will need approval from White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, Mulvaney said. 

The White House budget chief said that "just because something is legal doesn't make it right," adding that "with few exceptions, the commercial air system used by millions of Americans every day is appropriate, even for very senior officials."

Various members of the president's Cabinet are under fire for their travel since taking public office, with Price on Friday resigning as head of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) after it was revealed he traveled on private jets for work, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Interior Secretary Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeMajority of National Park Service advisory board resigns amid protest Overnight Energy: Regulators say Perry plan didn’t pass legal muster | Chamber to push for 25-cent gas tax hike | Energy expert sees US becoming 'undisputed leader' in oil, gas Appeals court to hear suit against Interior challenging effects of coal mine leasing MORE and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittWith offshore drilling scheme, Trump's America looks like a banana republic Overnight Energy: California regulators vote to close nuclear plant | Watchdog expands Pruitt travel probe | Washington state seeks exemption from offshore drilling plan Overnight Regulation: Fight erupts over gun export rules | WH meets advocates on prison reform | Officials move to allow Medicaid work requirements | New IRS guidance on taxes MORE are also facing questions about their use of private aircraft for government business, while Veterans Affairs Secretary David ShulkinDavid Jonathon ShulkinA 2018 challenge to government animal experimenters: find your own funding Reforming veterans health care for all generations of veterans Trump signs executive order aimed at reducing veteran suicides MORE spent nearly half his time on a recent international trip sightseeing and shopping with his wife, who had her airfare paid for by the government, The Washington Post reported.