Justice releases anti-nepotism White House memos

Justice releases anti-nepotism White House memos
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The Justice Department has released several legal memos issued under past administrations that found it is unlawful for presidents to appoint family members to White House positions or commissions. 

The memos, issued to White Houses run by former Presidents Nixon, Carter, Reagan and Obama, were overruled in January by Deputy Assistant Attorney General Daniel Koffsky, a longtime Justice Department lawyer.

That decision paved the way for President TrumpDonald John TrumpDems flip Wisconsin state Senate seat Sessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants GOP rep: 'Sheet metal and garbage' everywhere in Haiti MORE's son-in-law, Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerHope Hicks to meet with House Intel in Russia probe: report US officials warned Kushner about friendship with Wendi Deng Murdoch: report Overnight Regulation: Fight erupts over gun export rules | WH meets advocates on prison reform | Officials move to allow Medicaid work requirements | New IRS guidance on taxes MORE, to become a senior adviser at the White House. 

The president's elder daughter, Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump’s first year in office was the year of the woman US officials warned Kushner about friendship with Wendi Deng Murdoch: report Top House Intel Dem wants to call Ivanka as witness in Russia probe MORE, eventually became a senior adviser as well, albeit in an unpaid capacity. 

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The legal memos concluding that the president cannot appoint relatives to his White House staff or advisory commissions were obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request by Politico, which posted them online. 

According to the documents, Justice Department lawyers had held for decades that a 1967 anti-nepotism law barred the president from appointing family members to White House positions. 

For example, a 2009 opinion issued to the Obama White House forbade the president from appointing his half-sister to a White House fellowships commission and his brother-in-law to a fitness commission. 

The legal memos were overruled in January of this year. Koffsky concluded that a 1978 law gave the president broad authority to hire for White House positions.