Trump: 'I don't see a deal' to avoid government shutdown

President Trump on Tuesday cast doubt on Washington's ability to avoid a government shutdown, writing on Twitter that he didn't believe a deal could be reached with Democrats.

The tweet came hours before Trump is to meet at the White House with GOP congressional leaders as well as Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Finance: White House planning new tax cut proposal this summer | Schumer wants Congress to block reported ZTE deal | Tech scrambles to comply with new data rules OPEC and Russia may raise oil output under pressure from Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — GOP centrists in striking distance of immigration vote MORE (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiElection fears recede for House Republicans Senate harassment bill runs into opposition from House 2018 midterms: The blue wave or a red dawn? MORE (D-Calif.).

"Meeting with 'Chuck and Nancy' today about keeping government open and working," Trump tweeted. 

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"Problem is they want illegal immigrants flooding into our Country unchecked, are weak on Crime and want to substantially RAISE Taxes. I don’t see a deal!"

Democrats have demanded that a funding deal include language to protect young undocumented immigrants known as "Dreamers" who are threatened with deportation next year because of Trump's decision to end an Obama-era program.

The White House and Republicans in Congress have countered with heavy demands on border enforcement.

The current funding bill, brokered in a surprise deal between Trump and Democrats in September that caught Republicans off-guard, expires on Dec. 8. The deal also irritated congressional Republicans and conservatives, which could explain Trump's tweet on Tuesday.

In the past, Trump has flirted with the idea of a government shutdown, saying that it might be necessary in order to win support for a wall on the Mexican border. 

There has been some talk of a short-term deal, lasting a matter of weeks, that could provide time for the White House and lawmakers to negotiate a longer funding deal for the rest of the fiscal year ending on Sept. 30.

Another complication is the fight over separate legislation to change the tax code. Democrats oppose the measure, which may receive a Senate vote this week.

Trump hopes to complete work on the tax bill before the end of the year, but that will require Senate passage and then another round of talks to work out differences between the House and Senate tax bills. Both chambers would also have to vote on the compromise bill.

All of that has the potential to raise tensions surrounding the funding bill, where Democrats and Republicans have differences that go well beyond the thorny immigration issue.

This report was updated at 9:55 a.m.