Sessions under fire from all sides

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHouston restaurant shuts down social media after Sessions photo backlash ACLU’s lawsuit may force Trump to stop granting asylum applications US judge rejects Russian company’s bid to dismiss Mueller charges MORE's job security is in question after taking withering fire from fellow Republicans this week, including from two prominent House conservatives who called on him to resign.

Two leaders of the House Freedom Caucus, Reps. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsMeadows says FBI made 'right' decision firing Strzok Republicans have spent .5 million at Trump properties since he took office: report Conservative editor: House GOP should not try to impeach Rosenstein MORE (R-N.C.) and Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanRepublicans and Democrats alike face troubling signals from voters Ex-OSU wrestler walks back accusations against Jordan: I don’t know if he 'directly' knew about abuse GOP chairman readies Steele dossier subpoenas MORE (R-Ohio), called on Sessions to step aside in an op-ed Friday, charging he has lost control of the Department of Justice and the FBI.

Sessions has also come under criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike for his decision to rescind the Obama-era Cole memo, which gave states the space to legalize marijuana without fear of federal interference. 

By withdrawing the memo, Sessions gave federal prosecutors more leeway to pursue cases against the legal marijuana industry, which is expanding rapidly in several states.

Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSenate GOP campaign arm asking Trump to endorse McSally in Arizona: report When it comes to drone tech, wildfire officials need the rights tools for the job Rubio slams Google over plans to unveil censored Chinese search engine MORE (R), whose home state of Colorado is host to a booming legal cannabis industry, ripped Sessions on the Senate floor Thursday and accused him of breaking a personal pledge not to change the Obama-era policy.

“When you have Republicans calling for you to step down and you’re in a Republican administration just entering your second year, that’s trouble. He’s really on borrowed time,” said Brian Darling, a Republican strategist and former Senate aide. 

“This is an attorney general who has been ridiculed by his own boss on Twitter,” he said, referring to President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE. “At one point he didn’t have the confidence of his own boss and he’s losing the confidence of the Freedom Caucus and conservatives in the House and Senate.”

Trump reiterated his frustration with Sessions in a recent interview, again criticizing his decision to recuse himself from the Justice Department’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

“I thought it was certainly unnecessary, I thought it was a terrible thing,” Trump told The New York Times.

A new report this week revealed the lengths to which Trump went to keep Sessions from turning over the Russia probe to Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down US judge rejects Russian company’s bid to dismiss Mueller charges Falwell Jr.: Sessions and Rosenstein ‘deceived’ Trump into appointing them and should ‘rot’ in jail MORE.

The president took the unusual step of sending White House counsel Don McGahn to lobby Sessions against recusal, according to the Times. Sessions told McGahn his mind was made up, saying he had been advised to do so by other officials in the Justice Department.

The recusal has become a sore spot in the relationship between Trump and Sessions. The president reportedly blames his attorney general for the appointment of Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE as special counsel, a move that was made by Rosenstein. 

“There’s a feeling on the right that Rod Rosenstein is running the Justice Department, not Jeff Sessions. He’s not doing anything. He’s recused himself to the point that he can’t do his job anymore,” Darling said. 

Sessions is still taking heat from the president’s allies over the decision.

Meadows and Jordan argued in an op-ed published in the Washington Examiner on Friday that the FBI investigation into Russian collusion has run amok.

“It would appear he has no control at all of the premier law enforcement agency in the world,” they wrote.

“If Sessions can't address this issue immediately, then we have one final question needing an answer: When is it time for a new attorney general? Sadly, it seems the answer is now,” they concluded.

Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherTrump campaign aide socialized with alleged Russian agent during 2016 campaign: report Election Countdown: Trump jumps into Ohio special election fight | What to watch in Tennessee primaries | Koch network freezes out Republicans who crossed them | Dead heat in Texas, Nevada Senate races | How celebs are getting into the midterms Dems make big play for House in California MORE (R-Calif.) in an interview Friday accused Sessions of betraying Trump by giving Mueller unfettered ability to investigate the president. 

“He is a Cabinet-level piñata. He doesn’t seem to enjoy the confidence and trust of the president. He’s done a number of things on immigration and the most recent on marijuana that seem not to be playing well across the country,” said Ross K. Baker, a professor of political science at Rutgers University.

“I’m sure there are days that Attorney General Sessions wishes he were back in the United States Senate,” he added.

A Trump administration official, however, said Friday that there’s little chance that criticism from Meadows, Jordan or other congressional Republicans would pressure Sessions to resign. 

“If the president starts to criticize him again, that’s a different story,” the source said.

Sessions offered his resignation to Trump earlier this year but the president declined to accept it.

The official said Sessions has responded to Trump’s earlier criticism that the Department of Justice hadn’t done enough to investigate his 2016 rival Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down Signs grow that Mueller is zeroing in on Roger Stone Omarosa claims president called Trump Jr. a 'f--- up' for releasing Trump Tower emails MORE.

The department has reopened an investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of State and launched a new probe into the Clinton Foundation. 

“He has started to rebut the earlier criticism,” the source said of Sessions.

Ironically, Sessions’s biggest allies may be Democrats who don’t want him to step down as attorney general. They fear a new attorney general who is not bound by a recusal could bring the Russian investigation to a swift end.

Even though he opposed his nomination to head the Justice Department last year, Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSenate Democrats should stop playing politics on Kavanaugh Montana GOP Senate hopeful touts Trump's support in new ad Strong job growth drives home choice for voters this election MORE (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that he wants Sessions to keep his job.

“My view now is very simple: nothing, nothing should ever interfere with the Mueller investigation,” he said.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, which would hold hearings and vote on a new attorney general, told CNN, “I don’t think the case has been made for his resigning,” referring to Sessions.

“It would be problematic in a lot of ways,” he said.

Republican strategists say Sessions will probably stay in the job because his resignation or dismissal would cause a major uproar and spark accusations of political interference in the Russia investigation.

“Because of the prominence of the Russia probe it’s very hard to see him leaving the administration even though he has gone against the wishes of the White House in recusing himself,” said Ford O’Connell, a Republican strategist. “How are you going to get a new attorney general through Congress?”

The Senate Republican majority has shrunk to 51 seats, and there are several GOP senators who have been outspokenly critical of Trump, including Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainOvernight Defense: Trump signs 7B defense policy bill into law | Rips McCain hours after signing bill named after him | Green Beret killed in Afghanistan blast Tapper thanks McCain for his service ‘since President Trump would not do it’ Trump rips McCain hours after signing bill named after him MORE (Ariz.), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSenate GOP campaign arm asking Trump to endorse McSally in Arizona: report Arpaio says he misheard Sacha Baron Cohen questions Election Countdown: Takeaways from too-close-to-call Ohio special election | Trump endorsements cement power but come with risks | GOP leader's race now rated as 'toss-up' | Record numbers of women nominated | Latino candidates get prominent role in 2020 MORE (Ariz.) and Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SassePollster: Attitudes toward Trump's farm aid are 'highly wrapped up' in feelings toward president Poll: Majority of Americans support Trump's plan to offer aid to farmers hit by tariffs Hillicon Valley: 'QAnon' conspiracy theory jumps to primetime | Senate Intel broadens look into social media manipulation | Senate rejects push for more election security funds | Reddit reveals hack MORE (Neb.). That could make the confirmation process for a new attorney general exceedingly difficult.

“The biggest gripe against Sessions is his recusal,” O’Connell said. 

“A lot of the other things that Sessions has done, particularly now that we have an investigation into the Clinton Foundation, I think that overall people are relatively happy with Sessions,” he said. 

Politico reported Friday that Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Understanding EPA’s fuzzy math White House staff offered discounts at Trump's NJ golf club: report MORE — a former attorney general of Oklahoma — has expressed interest in replacing Sessions if he resigns.

Some GOP officials believe Trump could move Pruitt or another Senate-confirmed senior administration official into the attorney’s job temporarily, but Trump would spark a firestorm if he skipped the Department of Justice’s line of succession, which would call for Rosenstein to replace Sessions. 

One Senate Republican parliamentary expert said the president could not unilaterally appoint someone to fill the attorney general’s job permanently and with full power without Senate confirmation.