Kellyanne Conway found to have violated Hatch Act

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayConway asks why White House reporters are 'obsessed' with Trump Conway blasts Brennan: 'Why is he screaming' about losing his clearance 'on a lower-rated cable network?' Gorka: I signed NDAs in the White House, during Trump campaign MORE violated the Hatch Act on two occasions, the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) informed the Trump administration Tuesday.

Appearing in her official capacity, Conway endorsed and advocated against political candidates, the watchdog said, referring its findings to President TrumpDonald John TrumpBrennan fires new shot at Trump: ‘He’s drunk on power’ Trump aides discussed using security clearance revocations to distract from negative stories: report Trump tried to dissuade Melania from 'Be Best' anti-bullying campaign: report MORE "for appropriate disciplinary action."

The violations occurred during two television appearances in 2017, one on Fox News's "Fox & Friends," and one on CNN's "New Day."

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“While the Hatch Act allows federal employees to express their views about candidates and political issues as private citizens, it restricts employees from using their official government positions for partisan political purposes, including by trying to influence partisan elections,” OSC says in its report.

“Ms. Conway’s statements during the 'Fox & Friends' and 'New Day' interviews impermissibly mixed official government business with political views about candidates in the Alabama special election for U.S. Senate." 

The report goes on to state that Conway received "significant training" on the Hatch Act and possible violations. OSC says it gave Conway, a former GOP pollster who served as Trump's campaign manager, the opportunity to respond as part of its report, but she did not.

The White House rejected the report’s findings, saying “Conway did not advocate for or against the election of any particular candidate” in a statement provided to reporters.

“In fact, Kellyanne’s statements actually show her intention and desire to comply with the Hatch Act — as she twice declined to respond to the host’s specific invitation to encourage Alabamans to vote for the Republican,” deputy press secretary Hogan Gildley said.

Ahead of December's special election to replace Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSentencing reform deal heats up, pitting Trump against reliable allies Hill.TV poll: 41 percent of Americans want Mueller to wrap up probe before midterms The Hill's Morning Report: Dems have a majority in the Senate (this week) MORE in the Senate, Conway made remarks critical of then-candidate Doug Jones in his race against former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreEx-Sheriff David Clarke describes how he would have stopped anti-fascists in 1930s Germany on 'Who is America' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump to GOP: I will carry you GOP strategist: Trump will be anchor around Republicans' necks in general election MORE

During her initial Fox appearance, Conway blasted Jones as "weak on crime" and "weak on borders," before declining to specifically endorse Moore when asked.

“Doug Jones in Alabama, folks, don’t be fooled. He will be a vote against tax cuts. He is weak on crime, weak on borders. He is strong on raising your taxes. He is terrible for property owners," Conway said in November.

“So, vote Roy Moore?” host Brian Kilmeade interjected.

“I’m telling you that we want the votes in the Senate to get this tax bill through,” Conway responded.

In her CNN appearance in December, Conway went further, saying that Trump "doesn't want a liberal Democrat representing Alabama" in the Senate.

"The only endorsement that matters in this race is President Trump's," Conway said the week before the vote. "And he came out questioning the ideology and the vote of Doug Jones. He'll be a reliable vote for tax hikes. He'll be a reliable vote against border security. He'll be a reliable vote against national security and keeping [Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] ISIS in retreat. He'll be the reliable vote against the Second Amendment and against life."

At the time, former Office of Government Ethics Director Walter ShaubWalter Michael ShaubWH lawyer in charge of policing Trump officials' ethics to leave: report Ex-White House ethics chief: Sarah Sanders tweet violates ethics laws Ex-ethics chief: Melania Trump's visit to migrant shelter a 'flim flam con job' MORE called the comments a “slam dunk” violation of the Hatch Act.

“The willfulness of Conway’s violation and her openly expressed disdain for efforts to hold her accountable for complying with ethics requirements make clear that anything less than removal from the federal service or a lengthy unpaid suspension will not deter future misconduct on her part,” Shaub said.

Shaub filed two complaints with OSC over the interviews.

White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah defended Conway last year after initial criticism.

“Ms. Conway did not advocate for or against the election of a candidate, and specifically declined to encourage Alabamans to vote a certain way," Shah said in a statement.

"She was speaking about issues and her support for the president’s agenda. This election is for the people of Alabama to decide," he added.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ranking Democrat Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsTop Dem demands info on White House decision to revoke Brennan's clearance Federal judge dismisses Dem lawsuit over Trump hotel in DC Cummings: Trump has 'got to be better' about condemning racism MORE (Md.) demanded the president issue “swift and serious” punishment for the violations.

“The President must take swift and serious disciplinary action against Ms. Conway. Anything else sets a terrible example," Cummings said in a statement.

Hatch Act violations committed by White House staff are typically handled directly by the president. Consequences for violating the law range from an official reprimand to a civil penalty of up to $1,000. Other penalties include suspension, termination or even debarment from federal employment for up to five years.

—Updated at 1:16 p.m.