Refugee hardliner appointed to top State Department refugee post: report

Refugee hardliner appointed to top State Department refugee post: report
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A White House aide who has expressed hardline views on immigration has been appointed to a top position handling the issue of refugees at the State Department.

Andrew Veprek was appointed to be the deputy assistant secretary of the State Department's Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), a department official confirmed to The Hill.

Sources told Politico, which first reported the appointment, that Veprek has expressed strict views on refugees and migrants, and is reportedly tied closely to President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey: Trump's 'Spygate' claims are made up Trump taps vocal anti-illegal immigration advocate for State Dept's top refugee job Seattle Seahawks player: Trump is 'an idiot' for saying protesting NFL players 'shouldn’t be in the country' MORE's senior policy adviser Stephen Miller, long known for his tough approach to immigration policy.

"My experience is that he strongly believes that fewer refugees should be admitted into the United States and that international migration is something to be stopped, not managed," a former U.S. official told the news outlet.

Veprek was largely involved in the administration's withdrawal from global conversations on a non-binding global pact on refugee and migration matters, according to Politico.

In his new role, Veprek will assist in overseeing the bureau, which provides solutions for refugees around the world through "repatriation, local integration, and resettlement."

The administration has taken hardline stances on the issues of immigration and migration ever since it issued its first ban on refugees from certain majority-Muslim countries.

Reports surfaced last month that the State Department told refugee resettlement agencies that the maximum number of refugees allowed into the U.S. would decrease from 110,000 to 45,000 in 2018. 

The move signaled that there would no longer be a need for all of the 324 resettlement offices that were operating in 2017.