DOJ pushes back on McCabe saying he learned of firing from press release

The Department of Justice (DOJ) pushed back on a report Friday that former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeEx-CIA director 'would consider it an honor' if Trump revoked security clearance Ex-CIA spokesman: Trump could set precedent by revoking security clearances Trump renews calls for Mueller to investigate Clinton MORE learned of his firing from a press release.

A DOJ spokeswoman told The Hill that "Mr. McCabe and his lawyer were informed in advance of the news media" after a representative for McCabe told CNN that the No. 2 FBI official learned of his firing by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump indicates he's leaning against Mueller sit-down Trump rattled by White House counsel's cooperation with Mueller: report Falwell Jr. killed student newspaper articles critical of Trump: report MORE through a press release.

McCabe, who served with the FBI for more than 20 years, was fired Friday just two days shy of when he was set to retire, potentially jeopardizing his pension. McCabe had stepped down under pressure in January and was already on a leave of absence.

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Other former Trump administration officials have faced unceremonious ends to their careers.

Earlier this week, Trump ousted Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonTo solve the southern border crisis, look past the border Dems want GOP chairman to subpoena State Department over cyber docs Overnight Energy: Trump elephant trophy tweets blindsided staff | Execs of chemical plant that exploded during hurricane indicted | Interior to reverse pesticide ban at wildlife refuges MORE, who reportedly knew of his impending ouster ahead of time but was surprised when it was announced Tuesday on Twitter.

"The Secretary did not speak to the President this morning and is unaware of the reason, but he is grateful for the opportunity to serve, and still believes strongly that public service is a noble calling and not to be regretted," read a statement from a top Tillerson aide at the State Department who was later fired.

Former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyOvernight Defense: Pentagon says Trump canceled parade before cost briefing | Erik Prince renews push for contractors to run Afghan war | More officials join outcry over security clearances Trump faces mounting legal pressure on three fronts Trump indicates he's leaning against Mueller sit-down MORE also reportedly learned of his firing last year from a TV news report while speaking to employees at an FBI field office.

The Los Angeles Times reported last year that Comey initially thought the news was a prank, before staffers pulled him aside to inform him of the news from the White House.