Hatch: Those advising Trump to fire Mueller going against 'nation's best interest'

Hatch: Those advising Trump to fire Mueller going against 'nation's best interest'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP moderates hint at smooth confirmation ahead for Kavanaugh GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Yale Law School students, alumni denounce Trump Supreme Court pick MORE (R-Utah) on Thursday warned that anyone advising President TrumpDonald John TrumpSasse: Trump shouldn't dignify Putin with Helsinki summit Top LGBT group projects message onto Presidential Palace in Helsinki ahead of Trump-Putin summit Hillary Clinton to Trump ahead of Putin summit: 'Do you know which team you play for?' MORE to fire special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE doesn't have “the nation’s best interest at heart."

“Anyone advising the President — in public or over the airwaves — to fire Bob Mueller does not have the President or the nation’s best interest at heart,” Hatch tweeted. “Full stop.”

Hatch released a statement last month urging Trump to allow the investigation to continue "uninterrupted." 

ADVERTISEMENT
"I know Bob Mueller well and believe him to be a straight shooter, and I continue to believe that giving him the time and support necessary to get to the bottom of things is the best interest of all parties involved," Hatch said. 

Hatch said then that his conversations with the Trump White House convinced him that Trump "would not take such a foolish action." 

The Thursday criticism from the longest serving Republican senator came shortly after Trump denounced a New York Times report that he tried to fire Mueller in December.

“If I wanted to fire Robert Mueller in December, as reported by the Failing New York Times, I would have fired him,” Trump tweeted early Thursday. “Just more Fake News from a biased newspaper!”

On Monday, Trump said “many people” have suggested that he fire Mueller, who has been leading the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the following day that Trump “certainly believes” he has the power to oust the special counsel, despite many legal experts saying that it would be Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinCarl Bernstein: Recent indictments show Mueller probe is 'not a witch hunt' Gowdy rules out Rosenstein impeachment Five things to watch for in Trump-Putin summit MORE who would have to make the decision, since Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsConservatives moving to impeach Rosenstein soon: report Senators urge DOJ to probe whether Russians posed as Islamic extremist hackers to harass US military families The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies for Putin summit: 'He’s not my enemy’ MORE has recused himself from Russia-related investigations.

Some Trump allies have been calling on the president to fire Mueller in the days following the FBI raid on Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) compared the raid to Stalin and the Gestapo, Nazi Germany's secret police. 

However, several prominent party members have urged Trump not to fire Mueller.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyKavanaugh paper chase heats up Kavanaugh gets questionnaires for confirmation hearing Franken offers Dems a line of questioning for Kavanaugh's 'weirdly specific bit of bulls---' MORE (R-Iowa) declared Tuesday that “it would be suicide for the president to fire him.”

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOn paper, Wilkie is the perfect candidate for VA secretary, but his qualifications go further GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Administration to brief Senate panel on family reunifications MORE (R-N.C.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Health Care: Watchdog finds Tom Price improperly used funds on flights | Ex-Novartis CEO sent drug pricing proposal to Cohen | HHS staffers depart after controversial social media posts HHS staffers depart after controversial social media posts: report Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs MORE (R-S.C.) have both sponsored bipartisan bills to protect the special counsel from being fired by the president.