List reveals questions Mueller wants to ask Trump: report

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE has reportedly assembled a list of close to 50 questions he wants to ask President TrumpDonald John TrumpEx-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies Laura Bush blasts Trump migrant policy as 'cruel' and 'immoral' US denies report of coalition airstrike on Syria MORE as part of his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

The New York Times reported Monday that it obtained a list of the questions, which include inquiries related to Trump’s business dealings, his relationship with Russia and his communications with ex-staffers who have since been caught up in the probe. 

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The questions provide a window into what Mueller is interested in learning from Trump as the special counsel's probe nears the one-year mark.

A handful of the questions focus on communications between Trump or his campaign staffers and Russia. 

Mueller prepared to ask Trump about the well-known meeting at Trump Tower that involved Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpBannon: I don’t believe that Trump says things that are not true Giuliani: 'I doubt' Trump knew Roger Stone met with Russian during 2016 campaign The Hill's Morning Report — 'Sobering' IG report damages FBI MORE and a Russian lawyer, as well as whether the president himself discussed sanctions on Russia or meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin during the campaign, the Times reported.

In addition, Mueller reportedly planned to ask, "What knowledge did you have of any outreach by your campaign, including by Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortGiuliani: Trump is 'not going to issue pardons' during Mueller investigation Sunday Shows preview: Lawmakers, Trump allies discuss Russia probe, migrant family separation Trump must resist temptation to pardon Manafort for real crimes MORE, to Russia about potential assistance to the campaign?”

Manafort, Trump's former campaign chairman who is set to go on trial in the Mueller probe in the coming months, has not yet been linked publicly to any campaign outreach to Russia. 

Another question focuses on what Trump knew, if anything, about Russian hacking during the presidential race. Trump during the 2016 campaign praised WikiLeaks for disseminating hacked emails from Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThere are many unanswered questions about FBI culture FBI agent who sent anti-Trump texts offers to testify on Capitol Hill Giuliani wants 'full and complete' investigation into Russia probe's origins MORE's campaign and called on Russia to find her deleted emails from her time as secretary of State.

Several of Mueller's reported questions also focus on Trump's decisions to fire former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThere are many unanswered questions about FBI culture FBI agent who sent anti-Trump texts offers to testify on Capitol Hill Schiff: ‘Deeply disturbing’ that FBI gave Nunes confidential info on Clinton's emails MORE.

In both cases, Mueller appeared poised to ask when and why Trump decided to fire Comey and Flynn and who was involved in each decision.

Trump's explanation for why he fired each individual has appeared to change at times, stoking speculation that the president may have obstructed justice.

Mueller also planned to inquire about Trump's reported efforts to fire the special counsel.

"What discussions did you have regarding terminating the special counsel, and what did you do when that consideration was reported in January 2018?" the question states, according to The Times.

Trump reportedly sought to fire Mueller on two occasions, but was talked out of it in both instances.

The special counsel also showed interest in a variety of other associates and administration officials, including Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsLaura Bush blasts Trump migrant policy as 'cruel' and 'immoral' Merkley leads Dem lawmakers to border amid migrant policy outcry DHS secretary defends Trump administration's migrant policies MORE; Michael Cohen, Trump's personal attorney; Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerNorth Korea looked to set up communications back channel through Kushner: report Prison reform, peace, and pardons: Jared Kushner's bold and lasting portfolio UK planning international meeting with Kushner to talk Mideast peace plan: report MORE, Trump's son-in-law and a senior adviser; and former White House chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusBannon: Sessions an 'excellent' AG, Trump 'wrong' about recusal GOP lawmakers, top advisers have campaigned to stop Trump from firing Sessions: report Exclusive: Bannon says Rosenstein could be fired 'very shortly' MORE, among others, according to the Times report.

Trump has repeatedly denied he or his campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 election. He has often called Mueller's investigation a “witch hunt” and a “hoax.” 

The president has said on multiple occasions he’d be willing to speak with Mueller as part of the probe. However, he has reportedly cooled on the idea after FBI agents raided Cohen's home and office.

Former New York City Mayer Rudy Giuliani (R), whom Trump recently hired for his legal team, reportedly met with Mueller last week to discuss details of a possible interview with the president.

Giuliani, who served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York in the 1980s, told The Washington Post that he joined Trump's legal team "because I hope we can negotiate an end to this for the good of the country and because I have high regard for the president and for Bob Mueller."

Mueller’s investigation has thus far led to guilty pleas or indictments against four former Trump associates, including Flynn and Manafort.
 
The special counsel also fired charges against 13 Russian nationals for their alleged attempts to interfere in the 2016 election.

Updated at 9:50 p.m.