Trump mocks Dem lawmaker for introducing bill to repeal GOP tax cuts

Trump mocks Dem lawmaker for introducing bill to repeal GOP tax cuts
© UPI

President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN analyst Kirsten Powers: Melania's jacket should read 'Let them eat cake' CNN's Cuomo confronts Lewandowski over 'womp womp' remark Sessions says FBI agent Peter Strzok no longer has his security clearance MORE took to Twitter on Monday to mock a Democratic lawmaker for introducing a bill to repeal the GOP tax cuts, writing the move was “too good to be true for Republicans.”

“A Democratic lawmaker just introduced a bill to Repeal the GOP Tax Cuts (no chance),” Trump tweeted on Memorial Day.

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Trump was responding to Rep. Jared PolisJared Schutz PolisLawmakers request meeting with Amtrak CEO over funding for route Trump mocks Dem lawmaker for introducing bill to repeal GOP tax cuts Dem lawmaker introducing bill to repeal GOP tax cuts MORE (D-Colo.) who introduced a bill Wednesday that would undo the tax cuts passed by Republicans last year.

Polis’s legislation, titled the Students Over Special Interests Act, would repeal the GOP tax law and redirect the additional taxpayer money toward erasing student loan debt and making college more affordable.

Polis hit back at the president on Twitter, accusing the president and Republicans of standing up for "corporate special interests" with their legislation.

His bill is the first that would move to entirely reverse the GOP tax cuts and is unlikely to receive serious consideration while Republicans control both chambers of Congress.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerMontana's environmental lobby teams with governor to kill 600 jobs Dems allow separation of parents, children to continue, just to score political points Democrats' education agenda would jeopardize state-level success MORE (D-N.Y.) unveiled a proposal Tuesday that would eliminate a tax cut for the top 1 percent of earners.

That money would be used to invest in pay raises for teachers.

—Updated at 6:36 p.m.