Trump doubles down on family separation policy

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNFL freezes policy barring players from protesting during anthem McConnell spokesman on Putin visit: 'There is no invitation from Congress' Petition urges University of Virginia not to hire Marc Short MORE on Monday doubled down on his controversial policy of separating children from parents when families illegally cross the border, while also calling on Congress to change laws to end it.

In a series of tweets, Trump appeared to justify the strategy by claiming criminals are using children in a Trojan horse–style operation to cross the U.S. border.

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“Children are being used by some of the worst criminals on earth as a means to enter our country,” he wrote. “Has anyone been looking at the Crime taking place south of the border. It is historic, with some countries the most dangerous places in the world. Not going to happen in the U.S.”

Trump also warned that the U.S. must avoid the migration problems affecting Europe and blasted the policies and government of Germany, a close ally.

The president falsely claimed that crime in Germany is “is way up” and said migrants “have so strongly and violently changed their culture,” a phenomenon he said is generating backlash overseas.

“We don’t want what is happening with immigration in Europe to happen with us!” he wrote.

Trump’s policies, however, are facing growing criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike, who say it is inhumane to separate children from their families at border crossings.

The president again blamed Democrats in Congress for the separations, even though it was a Trump administration directive — and not a law — that instituted the policy.

“It is the Democrats fault for being weak and ineffective with Boarder Security and Crime. Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration. Change the laws!” he wrote.

“CHANGE THE LAWS!” he reiterated in a separate tweet.

Trump is set to meet on Tuesday with House Republicans, who are grappling with a pair of immigration measures, one of which would address the family separation issue.

He is expected to face criticism from some GOP lawmakers over the policy, which has generated negative headlines for Trump and his party just months before the November midterm elections.