Trump slams Dems for call to abolish ICE

Trump slams Dems for call to abolish ICE
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump warns Iran's Rouhani: Threaten us 'and you will suffer' Pompeo: Iran's leaders resemble the mafia NYT's Haberman: Trump 'often tells the truth' MORE on Tuesday accused Democrats of "demeaning" U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), suggesting that the criticism of the agency by some liberals could hurt the Democrats in the 2018 midterm elections.

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"When we have an 'infestation' of MS-13 GANGS in certain parts of our country, who do we send to get them out? ICE! They are tougher and smarter than these rough criminal elelments (sic) that bad immigration laws allow into our country. Dems do not appreciate the great job they do! Nov." he tweeted, the last word an apparent reference to the November elections.

"How can the Democrats, who are weak on the Border and weak on Crime, do well in November," the president asked in a second tweet. "The people of our Country want and demand Safety and Security, while the Democrats are more interested in ripping apart and demeaning (and not properly funding) our great Law Enforcement!"

Trump's tweets came as some Democrats have started to call for ICE to be abolished amid an intensifying controversy over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy prioritizing the prosecution of people who cross into the U.S. illegally through Mexico.

That policy has caused thousands of migrant children to be separated from their parents at the border. Protesters gathered in cities across the U.S. over the weekend to demand an end to the practice.

While Trump signed an executive order last month intended to allow children to be detained with their parents, it remains unclear how the government expects to enforce it. A 1997 consent decree bars law enforcement from holding minors for longer than 20 days — a limit that does not apply to adults.

Days after that order was signed, a federal judge in San Diego ordered the government to work quickly to reunite migrant families that had been separated under the policy. However, it is not clear how officials plan to meet the deadlines imposed by the court.