Trump voter fraud commission member says its claims were 'false'

Trump voter fraud commission member says its claims were 'false'
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A Democrat who served on President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE's voter fraud commission wrote in a letter to the White House this week that the findings presented by Vice President Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach were "false" and did not contain actual evidence of voter fraud.

In a letter to Pence and Kobach, the chairmen of the now-shuttered voter fraud commission, Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap (D) wrote that when it came to evidence of widespread voter fraud, the committee's final report was "glaringly empty."

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Dunlap posted the commission's findings online this week after previously suing the panel to obtain them.

"I have reviewed the documents made available to me and they do not contain evidence of widespread voter fraud," Dunlap wrote of the commission's work.

Dunlap added that the fact that "the commission predicted it would find widespread evidence of fraud actually reveals troubling bias."

“It’s calling into the darkness, looking for voter fraud,” he told The Associated Press. “There’s no real evidence of it anywhere.”

Kobach responded to Dunlap's letter in a statement to the AP, telling the news service that the commission had been presented with evidence of 8,400 cases of double-voting in 20 states in 2016, a figure which Dunlap denied ever seeing evidence for in his own statement.

The Kansas Republican added that if the commission had extended its research to all 50 states, more fraud would have been uncovered.

“Had the commission done the same analysis of all 50 states, the number would have been exponentially higher,” Kobach told the AP. “For some people, no matter how many cases of voter fraud you show them, there will never be enough for them to admit that there’s a problem."

Trump formed the voter fraud panel in 2017 to investigate his unsubstantiated accusation that Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down Signs grow that Mueller is zeroing in on Roger Stone Omarosa claims president called Trump Jr. a 'f--- up' for releasing Trump Tower emails MORE only won the popular vote due to millions of illegal votes cast in her name during the 2016 election.

The panel was later dissolved, with the White House stating that it would not use taxpayer resources to support the commission which had become bogged down in lawsuits.