White House criticizes McCain's Sotomayor vote

A White House spokesman said Tuesday that Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's dangerous Guantánamo fixation will fuel fire for terrorists Tech beefs up lobbying amid Russia scrutiny Ad encourages GOP senator to vote 'no' on tax bill MORE's (R-Ariz.) decision to vote against Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor is "disappointing."

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White House press secretary Robert Gibbs criticized McCain, President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaReport: FCC chair to push for complete repeal of net neutrality Right way and wrong way Keystone XL pipeline clears major hurdle despite recent leak MORE's opponent last year, saying that Sotomayor is qualified to sit on the bench.

"It's disappointing that Sen. McCain came to a different conclusion a day after talking about bipartisanship," Gibbs told reporters in his West Wing office.

While a senator, Obama voted against former President George W. Bush's nominations of Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justice Samuel Alito. The future president also voted in favor of filibustering Alito.

McCain said on the Senate floor Monday that Sotomayor is "an immensely qualified candidate," but she does not share his belief in judicial restraint.

"There is no doubt that Judge Sotomayor has the professional background and qualifications that one hopes for in a Supreme Court nominee," McCain said, before adding: "However, an excellent resume and an inspiring life story are not enough to qualify one for a lifetime of service on the Supreme Court."

Arizona has a large Hispanic population, but conservatives have doubts about Obama's nominee.

Sotomayor was voted out of the Judiciary Committee last week with McCain ally Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock Graham on Moore: 'We are about to give away a seat' key to Trump's agenda Tax plans show Congress putting donors over voters MORE (S.C.) the lone Republican voting with Democrats. Sotomayor is widely expected to be confirmed by the Senate this week.

— This story was updated at 10:19 a.m.