Poll: Five Senate Dems would lose to GOP challenger if elections held today

Poll: Five Senate Dems would lose to GOP challenger if elections held today
© Greg Nash

Five Senate Democrats trail their GOP challengers and would lose their bids for reelection were the 2018 midterms held today, according to polls from SurveyMonkey.

New polls published Thursday morning in Axios show Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillCalif. gov candidates battle for second place Senate panel advances Trump's CIA nominee Five votes to watch in fight over Trump's CIA nominee MORE (D-Mo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterOvernight Defense: Over 500 amendments proposed for defense bill | Measures address transgender troops, Yemen war | Trump taps acting VA chief as permanent secretary Not only do we need to support veterans, but their caregivers, too Trump Jr. prepares to hit the campaign trail ahead of midterms MORE (D-Mont.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinTrump to hold Nashville rally amid efforts to boost GOP Senate hopeful Voters Dems need aren't impressed by anti-waterboarding showboating Overnight Finance: House rejects farm bill in conservative revolt | NAFTA deal remains elusive as talks drag on | Dodd-Frank rollback set for House vote MORE (D-W.Va.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyVoters Dems need aren't impressed by anti-waterboarding showboating Overnight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers MORE (D-Ind.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOvernight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Senate confirms Haspel to head CIA MORE (D-N.D.) would all lose reelection to GOP challengers if voters were heading to the polls this week.

With the exception of McCaskill, who is squaring off against Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley (R), the senators were polled against generic, unnamed GOP challengers.

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President TrumpDonald John TrumpMexican presidential candidate vows to fire back at Trump's 'offensive' tweets Elizabeth Warren urges grads to fight for 'what is decent' in current political climate Jim Carrey takes aim at Kent State grad who posed with AR-10 MORE's approval rating hovers above 50 percent in those states, all states he won in 2016, while the five Democrats all suffer from approval ratings below the 50 percent line.

At the top of the list is Tester, who trails an unnamed GOP challenger by 13 points in a state where Trump enjoys an approval rating of 58 percent, considerably higher than his 43 percent national average.

The two least-vulnerable Democrats in the poll were Sens. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseySenators offer tax bill aimed at helping first responders McConnell: Midterms will be 'very challenging' for GOP Trump congratulates 'special guy' Barletta on win in Pennsylvania MORE (D-Pa.) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonOvernight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Senate confirms Haspel to head CIA MORE (D-Fla.), who both enjoy at least a 10-point gap between them and their announced challengers.

Democrats would need to defend all of these seats as well as pick up two others in order to take back the majority in the upper chamber in 2018.

SurveyMonkey conducted the poll online between Feb. 12 and March 5 and surveyed 17,289 voters in Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri, Indiana, West Virginia, Montana and North Dakota. The poll did not display a margin of error.