Pa. Gov. Rendell outlines possible Rep. Sestak job-offer scenario

Pa. Gov. Rendell outlines possible  Rep. Sestak job-offer scenario


Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell (D) said Wednesday he didn’t know if the White House tried to push Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) out of the state’s Senate primary with a job offer.

But he thinks he knows how it could have happened, because he once made a similar move.

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“I don’t know, but I will tell what I think happened. I did the same thing with Joe Hoeffel in 2006 when Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyRand's reversal advances Pompeo Vulnerable Senate Dems have big cash advantages Pompeo faces pivotal vote MORE told [then-Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman] Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCan Mueller be more honest than his colleagues? Throwing some cold water on all of the Korean summit optimism House Republicans push Mulvaney, Trump to rescind Gateway funds MORE [N.Y.] he would run as long as he had no primary,” Rendell said in an interview with the Hill.

Rendell said he called Hoeffel, a former Pennsylvania Democratic congressman, into his office and showed him polling that Bob Casey, Jr., who eventually won the Senate seat from Rick Santorum (R), was a better general-election candidate. He also said that he told Hoeffel he didn’t want a divided primary that would drain the Democrats’ resources before facing the well-funded Santorum.

Rendell said he told Hoeffel that if he did withdraw from challenging Casey, he should come see the governor to discuss what’s next for him but did not offer him a specific position in his administration.

“ ‘I know you have a desire to stay in government. You are like me. You are a government junkie,’ ” Rendell said he told Hoeffel. The governor did end up appointing Hoeffel as deputy secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Community and Economic Development.

“He did withdraw. He did come to see me. I put him in charge of our foreign trade — it’s called World Trade PA. He did a great job,” Rendell said.

Rendell said he thinks similar discussions went on between Sestak and the White House.

“I guarantee you that the White House did not say, ‘Withdraw and we’ll make you Secretary of Navy,’ ” Rendell said. He added that the White House and Sestak should address the issue quickly, though, in order to resolve it.

“The voters don’t care about it. This is a Beltway issue. We can get this behind them and start concentrating on the real issues,” Rendell said. “If you let it linger, it grows.”

Meanwhile, Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday requested that the administration appoint a special prosecutor to probe allegations it offered Sestak a job.

In a letter to Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderComey's book tour is all about 'truth' — but his FBI tenure, not so much James Comey and Andrew McCabe: You read, you decide Eric Holder headed to New Hampshire for high-profile event MORE, the members say the alleged offer could have violated federal laws that prohibit the “promise of employment or other benefit for political activity.”

Republicans have escalated pressure on the White House and Sestak to reveal what, if anything, was offered to Sestak to give Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.) — whom President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaAfter Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp ‘Morning Joe’ host: Trump tweeting during Barbara Bush funeral ‘insulting’ to US Trump and Macron: Two loud presidents, in different ways MORE endorsed — a clear path for reelection.

Republican senators who signed the letter are: ranking member Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Why does Scott Pruitt still have a job? DOJ announces M grant to cover costs associated with Parkland shooting ‘Morning Joe’ host: Trump tweeting during Barbara Bush funeral ‘insulting’ to US MORE (Ala.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump struggles to get new IRS team in place Romney forced into GOP primary for Utah Senate nomination Romney won't commit yet to supporting Trump in 2020 MORE (Utah), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Juan Williams: GOP support for Trump begins to crack This week: Senate barrels toward showdown over Pompeo MORE (Iowa), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Paul backs Pompeo, clearing path for confirmation Can Silicon Valley expect European-style regulation here at home? MORE (S.C.), John CornynJohn CornynRand's reversal advances Pompeo Joe Scarborough predicts Trump won't run in 2020 Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller MORE (Texas) and Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnPension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands Paul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism Republicans in Congress shouldn't try to bring back earmarks MORE (Okla.)

Several months ago, Sestak claimed he received an offer from the White House. At the time, Sestak was trailing the Republican-turned-Democratic senator, but eventually beat him in the primary last week.

It’s not clear how the White House will respond to the letter; officials have remained mum on the subject in recent days despite taking repeated questions from the press about the topic.

Several high-profile Democrats have also called on the White House and Sestak to clear the air, including Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinPompeo faces pivotal vote To succeed in Syria, Democrats should not resist Trump policy Hannity, Kimmel, Farrow among Time's '100 Most Influential' MORE (Ill.), a close ally of Obama.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ranking member Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who has led the charge in calling for a probe, has called the offer an “impeachable offense” if proven true.

— Kevin Bogardus, Russell Berman and Jordan Fabian

Former DNC chairman says the party should prepare for big losses in election

Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell (D) said Wednesday that Democrats on Capitol Hill should expect big losses in the 2010 midterm elections. 

Rendell told The Hill the best-case scenario was for the party to hold 54 to 55 Senate seats while only losing 20 to 25 House seats. That would still keep Democrats in the majority in both chambers.

“We are going to lose and people say it is shocking that the Obama administration is in such tatters. Baloney!” Rendell said.

The former Democratic National Committee chairman said the tough economy would be to blame for party losses this November. He said President Ronald Reagan also lost big numbers of House seats during his first term midterm election because people were hurting from the economy then too and that President Barack Obama has a much bigger economic challenge on his hands than Reagan did.

“You have the worst recession since the Depression. When people lose their jobs, lose their 401(k)s, lose their homes, they are going to be angry and their anger is going to be directed at people in office,” Rendell said.

The Pennsylvania governor, who is leaving office after this election, said his political advice to candidates would be not to run away from their incumbent positions or the president.

Instead, they should campaign on what they have achieved in office. If he had voted for the healthcare reform bill, the governor said, he would give example after example of how it would improve people’s lives now, such as children not being denied healthcare coverage for pre-existing conditions as of Sept. 1 this year.

“If you’re an incumbent, you can’t hide. You can’t run away. Run on what you have done, run on what you have done,” Rendell said.

— K.B. and R.B.


Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand's reversal advances Pompeo Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit After Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp MORE shakes up campaign in wake of controversy

Kentucky Senate candidate Rand Paul (R) replaced his campaign manager with a veteran staffer from his father’s 2008 presidential run, the Ballot Box has confirmed.

David Adams, the former manager, will now be campaign chairman with Jesse Benton coming in as manager. Benton was Rep. Ron Paul’s (R-Texas) communications director during his 2008 presidential run.

Adams denied the shake-up was a result of the media firestorm that resulted from Rand Paul’s comments about civil rights.

“This is totally unrelated to that,” he told the Ballot Box. Adams said the move had been “in the works” since before the primary vote.

Still, he admitted that word leaked about the changes before the campaign was prepared to make a public announcement. The change was first reported by The Washington Post.

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“We’re in the process still of putting everything on paper,” he said. “We’re still working on this internally.”

Adams said he was satisfied with his new role. “I’m very pleased with the changes. It will make my life easier,” he said.

The Paul campaign is expecting to announce new hires in the coming days, he added.

— S.J.M.

Miller is a campaign reporter for The Hill.  He can be found on The Hill’s Ballot Box, located at thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box.