2012 hopefuls are not showing the Tea Party candidates the money

Senate GOP candidates backed by the Tea Party movement have received much less financial support than more established candidates from their party’s leading contenders for the White House.

The GOP figures jockeying for a 2012 bid have largely avoided contributing from their political action committees (PACs) to Christine O’Donnell in Delaware, Rand PaulRand PaulGOP operative Ed Rollins joins pro-Trump super-PAC Overnight Energy: Clinton makes her pitch to coal country Rand Paul calls on Clinton to apologize for coal job losses MORE in Kentucky, Joe Miller in Alaska, Mike LeeMike LeeReid: Cruz, Lee on Supreme Court should 'scare you' Cruz: Boehner unleashed his ‘inner Trump’ Senate pressured to take up email privacy bill after overwhelming House vote MORE in Utah, Ken Buck in Colorado and Sharron Angle in Nevada.

ADVERTISEMENT
All six won GOP contests against rivals backed by the Republican establishment, largely because of support from the Tea Party movement. O’Donnell knocked off a sitting GOP House member, while Miller and Lee bested incumbent GOP senators.

But the six have received only a combined $38,000 from 10 leading Republicans thought to be eyeing a White House run. In comparison, Rob PortmanRob PortmanTrump ticket looms over vulnerable GOP senators Poll: Government not doing enough to fight drug abuse Koch network super-PAC launches ad buys in Wisconsin, Nevada MORE, a former congressman and Bush administration official who is the GOP Senate candidate in Ohio, has received $29,400 alone.

Most of the donations to the Tea Party six has come from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, the front-runner for the GOP nomination, according to a Gallup poll released Thursday.

Romney has donated the maximum $5,000 to O’Donnell, Lee, Buck and Angle, while Palin’s PAC distributed $9,500 to the six candidates, according to an analysis of campaign donations conducted by The Hill.

By contrast, sitting Republican senators and candidates recruited by national Republicans to run for the Senate have netted almost a quarter-million in donations.

That crop of establishment candidates includes Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteAyotte will back Trump in general election Trump ticket looms over vulnerable GOP senators The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE in New Hampshire, Rep. Roy BluntRoy BluntOvernight Healthcare: Medicare fight looms on Capitol Hill Senate GOP hardening stance against emergency funding for Zika Senate Dems accuse GOP of walking away from Zika deal MORE in Missouri, Rep. John BoozmanJohn BoozmanDem Senate candidate rips Trump’s ‘serial harassment’ of women Bringing US rice back to Cuba Senate passes energy reform bill MORE in Arkansas, former Sen. Dan CoatsDan CoatsYoung beats Stutzman in Indiana Senate GOP primary Ind. Senate candidate paid relative 0K for campaign work GOP blasts Obama for slow economic growth MORE in Indiana, Carly Fiorina in California, Gov. John HoevenJohn HoevenThis week: Congress on track to miss Puerto Rico deadline Week ahead: Senate looks to wrap up energy, water spending bill Overnight Energy: Senate blocks GOP bill targeting water rule MORE in North Dakota, Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonKoch-linked group keeps up attacks on Feingold Trump ticket looms over vulnerable GOP senators Koch network super-PAC launches ad buys in Wisconsin, Nevada MORE in Wisconsin, Rep. Mark KirkMark KirkTrump ticket looms over vulnerable GOP senators Elizabeth Warren stumps, raises funds for Duckworth GOP blocks slate of Obama judicial nominees MORE in Illinois, Rep. Jerry MoranJerry MoranHigher education involvement benefits unmanned aircraft systems safety and innovation Overnight Finance: McConnell fast-tracks IRS bills; WH pushes free college tuition The Trail 2016: New Trump same as the old MORE in Kansas, Portman in Ohio, John Raese in West Virginia, Dino Rossi in Washington state and former Rep. Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania.

The Hill looked at contributions from Romney, Palin, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneAir traffic control plan faces tough fight ahead GOP blasts Obama for slow economic growth Overnight Tech: Business data deals on FCC agenda MORE (S.D.), former Speaker Newt Gingrich (Ga.), former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, 2008 presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul (Texas), Rep. Mike Pence (Ind.) and former Sen. Rick Santorum (Pa.).

Both Romney and Thune have made large footprints in the Senate landscape with their PACs. Thune, a member of the Senate GOP leadership who is running unopposed for reelection, has doled out more than $175,000 this cycle.  Romney, who’s also spent heavily in House and gubernatorial races, has spent about $125,000 on Senate candidates.

But when it comes to some of the insurgent, Tea Party-backed candidates who’ve beaten incumbent Republicans or establishment-backed candidates in primaries, Republican candidates for president aren’t always backing up their professed support with campaign cash.

Thune’s Heartland Values PAC, for instance, said that it hadn’t donated to O’Donnell because she hadn’t asked for support.

“I don’t know if we’ve received a request,” said Justin Brasell, a PAC spokesman. “Sen. Thune supports our Republican Senate nominees.”

The approach by many of the potential candidates differs sharply from that of Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), a dark-horse White House contender.

DeMint, through his Senate Conservatives Fund, has backed many of the Tea Party candidates this cycle, sometimes during the primary. Angle, Buck and Paul have all received $5,000 from DeMint’s PAC, and Lee received $10,000.

White House contenders typically set up PACs and dole out cash to build support to run for higher office. The hope is that those helped out will offer endorsements and fundraising down the road.

As a result, the donations are both an indication of the presidential contenders’ view of the crop of Senate nominees and a bid to build a political base.

By that measure, would-be GOP presidential candidates are betting in a major way on Blunt and Portman, who have received close to $30,000 apiece from the presidential hopefuls. Ayotte, Coats, Fiorina, Hoeven and Toomey each has received between $20,000 to $25,000.

Marco RubioMarco RubioKasich quitting presidential race Trump: GOP critics can come back after my 'two terms' Against all odds: It’s Trump MORE, the Republican Senate nominee in Florida who has excited conservatives across the country, has been quickly embraced by the establishment. He’s received $17,400 from Thune, Romney, Pawlenty and Huckabee. DeMint has also given a maximum donation.

Some of the other Tea Party candidates could also pick up steam in the four and a half weeks between now and Election Day.

Pawlenty’s Freedom First PAC, for instance, has distributed just over $46,000 so far to GOP Senate candidates, but plans unspecified donations to O’Donnell and Miller.

“Obviously there’s too many competitive races in a great cycle like this to contribute to every single candidate who we like, but we’re using our resources wisely and supporting as many as possible,” said Alex Conant, a spokesman for Pawlenty.

Hogan Gidley, the executive director of Huckabee’s HuckPAC, was quick to point out that support for candidates extends well beyond pure donations.

“In addition to financial assistance, much of Gov. Huckabee’s work on behalf of candidates flies underneath the D.C. press radar,” he said. “While the robo-calls and radio ads we cut for our candidates aren’t as flashy to many in the elite media, the campaigns we’ve helped sure appreciate them and understand their value.”

Other possible candidates, like Pence and Barbour, have focused their resources in other contests in which they have a stake. Pence has given to Coats and Blunt, but otherwise focused on House races.

Barbour’s been more active in Senate races, donating $53,500. But his political impact’s been felt much more heavily through his work as chairman of the Republican Governors Association (RGA), where he’s raised millions in support of GOP gubernatorial candidates.

Pawlenty, like Romney and Barbour, has also been active. “So far we’re proud to have given over $320,000 to more than 160 conservative candidates across the country, and many more candidates are benefiting from Gov. Pawlenty’s work as vice chair of the RGA and his fundraising efforts for the NRSC, NRCC and RNC,” Conant said.