Democrats file first legal challenges

Democrats have filed their first legal challenges before polls even closed on Election Day, asking for an extension of voting hours in Connecticut and questioning the denial of provisional ballots in Illinois.
 
Sen. Robert MenendezRobert MenendezBipartisan group, Netflix actress back bill for American Latino Museum The Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see Taiwan deserves to participate in United Nations MORE (D-N.J.), the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCCC), told reporters at party headquarters that officials had gone to court in two states. In Connecticut, the party has asked for a one-hour extension of voting in Bridgeport, a Democratic stronghold where turnout was reported so high that officials ran out of ballots, Menendez said.
 

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State Attorney General Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalOnly Congress can enable drone technology to reach its full potential Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Dems urge Sessions to reject AT&T-Time Warner merger MORE (D) is battling Republican Linda McMahon in that state.
 
In Illinois, Menendez said Democrats had filed a Freedom of Information Act request for provisional ballots after learning voters who had not filled out the absentee ballot requests they submitted were denied provisional ballots in violation of election law.
 
“In certain counties, those individuals have been stopped from voting, and we want that to be clear that they’re allowed to vote and we want their votes to count,” Menendez said.
 
Illinois has one of the closest Senate races in the country, with Democrat Alexi Giannoulias facing Republican Rep. Mark KirkMark KirkWhy Qatar Is a problem for Washington Taking the easy layup: Why brain cancer patients depend on it The Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see MORE.
 
Menendez said Democrats had “a great legal team.” While he voiced hope that most races would not require recounts, he said, “We may not fully know tonight” the results in every state.