Senate Dems flex fundraising muscle; House GOP freshmen come up short

Democratic Senate candidates — including those incumbents most at risk in 2012 — proved themselves fundraising forces to be reckoned with during the third quarter of the year, while many first-term Republicans had a hard time cashing in.

Fundraising reports from July through September show that despite the anti-incumbent mood and President Obama’s difficulties keeping his approval ratings afloat, Democrats are still checking the boxes they need to be competitive in next year’s House and Senate contests.

ADVERTISEMENT
In Florida, Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonDem asks airlines to cap airfares ahead of Hurricane Maria Trump encourages Rick Scott to run for Senate Overnight Regulation: House moves to block methane rule | Senators wrestle with allowing driverless trucks | EPA delays toxic waste rule MORE (D) pulled in just under $2 million, while his GOP opponents topped out at about one-half million. Democratic Sens. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterFive things to know about Sanders’s single-payer plan Where Dems stand on Sanders's single-payer bill Overnight Regulation: DeVos ignites backlash with rewrite of campus sexual assault policy l EPA power plant rule decision likely this fall | Panel approves Trump financial regulator nominees MORE (Mont.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGOP sees fresh opening with Dems’ single payer embrace Senators blast internet subsidy program It is time to make domestic terrorism a federal crime MORE (Mo.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowMich. Senate candidate opts for House run instead Report: GOP donors can't get in touch with Kid Rock Kid Rock denies press credentials to Detroit paper MORE (Mich.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell Brown'Hillbilly Elegy' author won't run for Senate Brown, Portman urge Trump administration to move quickly on a steel decision Dems call on DeVos to work with CFPB to protect student borrowers MORE (Ohio) all raised about $1.2 million for their difficult reelection battles, while Sen. Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Poll finds little support for Menendez reelection Judge tells Menendez lawyer to 'shut up' MORE (D-N.J.) raked in $1.7 million even without a clear GOP opponent, and now has a $7 million war chest.

One of the eye-catching fundraisers was Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Trump bets base will stick with him on immigration Dems call for action against Cassidy-Graham ObamaCare repeal MORE, whose $3.1 million haul dwarfed any other candidate just six weeks after she officially entered the Democratic primary to take on incumbent Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.). And like Tester and Rep. Shelley Berkley (D-Nev.), who’s running against incumbent Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Lawmakers grapple with warrantless wiretapping program Overnight Health Care: New GOP ObamaCare repeal bill gains momentum MORE (R-Nev.), Warren outraised her GOP opponent in the race by about 2-to-1.

Not all Democrats fared as well. Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) raised just $443,000, less than the $583,000 that Republican front-runner Jon Bruning pulled in. Stabenow was almost outraised by former Rep. Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.). And Sherrod Brown’s $1.2 million wasn’t enough to outdo Ohio state Treasurer Josh Mandel, who brought in $1.5 million.

And Republicans — especially those running in competitive primaries — also demonstrated some prowess. In Texas, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst totaled $4.6 million during the quarter, although about half of it came from his own pockets. Meanwhile, GOP opponents Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea GOP state lawmakers meet to plan possible constitutional convention MORE and Tom Lepper both raised about $1.1 million and have millions more in the bank.

Republicans got a head start in a number of open-seat races where the Democratic field has yet to come together. Rep. Rick Berg (R-N.D.) brought in $650,000 for his bid to replace Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.).

And, in Arizona, Rep. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCorker pressed as reelection challenges mount -trillion debt puts US fiscal house on very shaky ground Senate votes down Paul's bid to revoke war authorizations MORE (R) raised $550,000. That amounted to half of what primary opponent Wil Cardon brought in when Cardon’s $770,000 personal loan is included. Flake has almost $2.3 million on hand for the race to replace Sen. Jon Kyl (R). Democrat Don Bivens, who entered the race during the third quarter, pulled in $340,000, but Democrats are still looking to other candidates to run.

In the House, many first-term Republicans had a tough time building up the resources to fend off challengers. 

Rep. Charlie Bass (R-N.H.), who served for more than a decade, lost in 2006 and then took back his seat in 2010, raised only $147,000, less than half of the $359,000 amassed during the quarter by Democrat Ann Kuster, whom Bass defeated by fewer than 4,000 votes in 2010 and who is challenging him again.

In Arizona, former Rep. Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickMajor progressive group endorses Martha McSally challenger Women make little gains in new Congress McCain wins sixth Senate term MORE (D) raised more than Rep. Paul GosarPaul GosarHouse votes to block funding for EPA methane pollution rule McCain needs to start showing my constituents more respect Fresh Freedom Caucus demands stall GOP budget MORE (R), whom Kirkpatrick is targeting for a rematch after he unseated her in 2010. Kirkpatrick now has more than a $100,000 advantage over Gosar heading into the fourth quarter.

In a special House race in Oregon, where primary voters will pick their candidates on Nov. 8, Democratic front-runner Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Dems to Mattis: Don't delay transgender enlistment policy Washingtonians take center stage at Will on the Hill MORE reaffirmed her dominance over the other primary candidates, bringing in a striking $600,000. Democrats Brad Akavian and Brad Witt each raised less than $200,000, while Republican Rob Cornilles pulled in just over $500,000.

But in Iowa, where redistricting has created an incumbent-versus-incumbent death match, Rep. Tom Latham (R) has $1.7 million cash on hand — four times as much as Rep. Leonard Boswell (D).