The 65 people who might run for president in 2016

There are 65 prominent people who might run for president in 2016.

The Democratic and Republican fields contrast sharply. Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAmazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods underscores the threat posed by ‘big data’ Pro-Trump group blasts 'rigged' Russia probe in ad starring Tomi Lahren Trump believes Russia 'probably' behind election hacking MORE is the clear front-runner, while there is no front-runner on the Republican side.

Twenty-three Democrats have been mentioned as a candidate or are eyeing a bid, according to an analysis by The Hill. The GOP side has 42.

Most of the people on this list won’t run, and some have adamantly claimed that they’re not interested. But many politicians have changed their minds on seeking the White House. Before mounting his 2008 bid, then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack ObamaInspector general report: Park Service did not change records of crowd size at inauguration Feehery: Medicaid reform opening Pro-Trump group blasts 'rigged' Russia probe in ad starring Tomi Lahren MORE (D-Ill.) said he wasn’t running.

The following is The Hill’s list of 65 people who might run for president in 2016.

Democrats 

Vice President Biden — Will he or won’t he? Polls show he is trailing Hillary Clinton badly. Last month, President Obama said Biden would be a “superb” commander in chief.

California Gov. Jerry Brown

Brown has run for president three times. He says a fourth is “not in the cards.” 

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock — Bullock is seen more as a vice presidential possibility.

Hillary Clinton — Will she run? Of course she will.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo — He would be a top contender if Clinton wasn’t running. But the ongoing corruption probe in New York looms over Cuomo’s head.

Howard Dean  

The former Vermont governor and 2004 presidential candidate told CNN he hopes Clinton wins. But last year, he warned she wouldn’t get a pass in the Democratic primary.  

Russ Feingold — The liberal darling mulled a 2008 bid before losing his reelection race in 2010.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBipartisan senators seek to boost expertise in military justice system Mattis gaining power in Trump’s Cabinet What do Democrats stand for? MORE (N.Y.) — Gillibrand has made it clear she backs Clinton. But if the former first lady doesn’t run, Gillibrand might.

Al GoreAl GoreBudowsky: Dems madder than hell Misreading lessons of an evolving electorate Manatt snags Jack Quinn MORE Few think he will run, but political analyst Mark Halperin sparked new speculation on “Morning Joe” last month, when he said the former vice president might challenge Clinton.

New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan — She might opt to run for the Senate in 2016.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper — A popular governor who has indicated he won’t run.

John KerryJohn KerrySpeaker Ryan, the fate of our policy toward Russia rests in your hands Frustrated Dems say Obama botched Russia response Budowsky: Dems madder than hell MORE    

The secretary of State absolutely ruled out a 2016 campaign earlier this year. But then again, so did Barack Obama before he ran in 2008.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharTime to get Trump’s new antitrust cop on the beat Going national with automatic voter registration Wildfires won't stop at the edge of public land — sustainability policy shouldn't either MORE (Minn.) — See Gillibrand. Klobuchar visited Iowa last year and will be back in the Hawkeye State this week to stump for Senate hopeful Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (D-Iowa).

Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote Senate Republicans reluctant to rush vote on healthcare bill Manchin: Senate can do 'an awful lot' to improve healthcare bill MORE (W.Va.) — There’s a Draft Joe Manchin effort out there, but the centrist is more likely to run for governor again should he leave the Senate.

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley — Uphill climb for O’Malley. How tough? Three members of the Maryland delegation (Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiBipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Dems press for paycheck fairness bill on Equal Pay Day After 30 years celebrating women’s history, have we made enough progress? MORE and Reps. Steny Hoyer and John Delaney) have already said they would back Clinton in the Democratic primary.

Janet Napolitano 
The Washington Post last year called the former governor and Cabinet official “a woman to watch in 2016.” 

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon — The unrest in Ferguson is a huge test for Nixon, whose last name wouldn’t be an asset if he runs.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick — Will likely run for president at some point, but not in 2016.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders: GOP healthcare bill 'barbaric and immoral' Sanders dodges question on FBI investigation into his wife Major progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement MORE The liberal Sanders, who is technically an independent, has said he would challenge Clinton if no one else from the left launches a bid.

Brian Schweitzer — The former governor of Montana has had a rough summer.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark WarnerOvernight Cybersecurity: Obama faces new scrutiny for Russia response | UK parliament cyberattacked | Election hacking fears put heat on DHS | Feds appeal to Supreme Court over data warrants Election hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security Are Democrats trying to pin the blame for their own sins on Russia? MORE (Va.) — Warner stunned political observers, when he didn’t run for president in 2008. He instead ran for the Senate and is up for reelection against Ed Gillespie this fall.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenMajor progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement Speaker Ryan, the fate of our policy toward Russia rests in your hands Democrats must end fiery rhetoric against AT&T-Time Warner merger MORE (Mass.) — Unlike Clinton, Warren has been busy on the campaign trail for Senate candidates.

Jim Webb — The former senator is eyeing a long-shot bid.

 

 

Republicans

Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteOPINION: Democracy will send ISIS to the same grave as communism Kelly Ayotte joins defense contractor's board of directors Week ahead: Comey firing dominates Washington MORE (N.H.) — Ayotte, who is up for reelection in 2016, is already being discussed as a vice presidential pick.

Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Bachmann'Real Housewives' producer 'begging' Conway to join cast Ex-rep admires furs amid PETA inaugural gala Why Republicans took aim at an ethics watchdog MORE (Minn.) — Tea Party favorite has said she might run again in 2016.

Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour — Barbour is well liked by the GOP establishment and was included in a Republican National Committee straw poll in January. 

Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnGoogle will no longer use data from personal Gmail accounts for advertising Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | MORE (Tenn.) 

Blackburn denied a report she is mulling a bid.

John Bolton — The former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations is leaving the 2016 door open.

Scott Brown — Brown is the underdog in his race against Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Senate overwhelmingly passes Russia sanctions deal Russia sanctions deal clears key Senate hurdle MORE (D-N.H.).

Jeb Bush — Bush fatigue would be a significant obstacle for the former Florida governor.

Herman Cain — Jon Stewart prayed on the air that Cain would run again.

Ben Carson 

Carson is a rising star in the GOP.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie — Bridge-gate hasn’t deterred Christie, who sounds like he’s going to be a candidate.

Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzFive takeaways from the CBO score on Senate ObamaCare bill Overnight Healthcare: CBO score imperils ObamaCare repeal | Breaking down the numbers | WH hits back over score | Trump phones holdouts | Dems plan floor protest New CBO analysis imperils GOP ObamaCare repeal MORE (Texas) — Tea Party star must convince kingmakers that he can beat Clinton.

Mitch Daniels — The ex-governor of Indiana decided against running in 2012 because of family concerns.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin — The former House member is in the mix of speculation.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam — He says he’s not interested in running.

Newt Gingrich — The 2012 presidential candidate and ex-Speaker might run again. Asked by Fox News’s Greta van Susteren about throwing his hat in the ring, Gingrich responded, “Ask me that in January of 2015.”

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley — Haley is always mentioned as a possible candidate.

Mike Huckabee

Huckabee’s poll numbers are quite good.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal — The former House member knows policy inside and out, but he would have to stand out amid the many personalities that will be on the 2016 stage.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich — Will Kasich and Ohio Sen. Rob PortmanRob PortmanFive takeaways from the CBO score on Senate ObamaCare bill McConnell allies confident in healthcare win GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them MORE both run? Regardless, Ohio is a must win for the GOP in 2016.

Rep. Pete King (N.Y.) — A frequent critic of Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas) and Rand PaulRand PaulJohnson becomes fourth GOP senator unwilling to proceed on healthcare bill Five takeaways from the CBO score on Senate ObamaCare bill Overnight Healthcare: CBO score imperils ObamaCare repeal | Breaking down the numbers | WH hits back over score | Trump phones holdouts | Dems plan floor protest MORE (Ky.).

Rep. Steve King (Iowa) — A kingmaker in Iowa and a hard-liner on immigration.

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez 

The first female Hispanic governor is not expected to run for president. But she will be a leading vice presidential candidate.

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersPaul Ryan: ‘Beautiful day’ to catch up with Bono Bono signs card for Scalise during Capitol Hill visit The Hill's Latina Leaders to Watch MORE (Wash.) — She has a bright future, though a presidential run in 2016 probably isn’t in the cards.

Sarah Palin — The RNC put her in its straw poll, but most think the former Alaska governor will remain on the sidelines.

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.) — Paul, who is up for reelection in 2016, looks like a sure bet to run for president. Of all the possible 2016 GOP hopefuls, Paul has arguably had the best 2014.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence — Pence is a dark horse who shouldn’t be overlooked. The former House member was Tea Party before the Tea Party existed and is well respected by social and fiscal conservatives.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry  

Comebacks are common in politics, but can Perry pull it off? He has two things going for him: The border crisis has put him front and center on the national stage, and the right has rallied behind him in the wake of his indictment in Texas.

Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio) — Portman, who is up for reelection in 2016, is headed to New Hampshire next week.

Condoleezza Rice — The former secretary of State routinely comes up in this conversation, but the chances of a Rice bid are remote.

 Rep. Mike Rogers (Mich.) — The retiring House member and soon-to-be talk-radio host hasn’t ruled out a run.

Mitt Romney — The rumors of another Romney run continue to persist.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioRubio: 'I hope' Mexican elections won't end partnership against cartels Election hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security Will Republicans stand up to the NRA's insurrection rhetoric? MORE (Fla.) 

Rubio will have to decide whether to run for president or reelection in 2016. As he said, “you can’t be on the ballot for two different offices” in Florida. 

Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanWinner of Georgia special election sworn in GOP chairman: More tax-reform hearings coming in July Speaker Ryan, the fate of our policy toward Russia rests in your hands MORE (Wis.) — He seems more intent on becoming Ways and Means Committee chairman than running for president.

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval — It’s more likely that Sandoval would challenge Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidCharles Koch thanks Harry Reid for helping his book sales Warren cautions Dems against infighting Dems see surge of new candidates MORE (D-Nev.) in 2016.

Rick Santorum 

The former Pennsylvania senator is being overlooked in the 2016 race. He did, after all, win the Iowa caucus in 2012.

Joe Scarborough — The host of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” is certainly eyeing a return to public office. Will it come sooner or later?

Sen. Tim ScottTim ScottIs Senate ObamaCare repeal bill too mean? The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Lawmakers celebrate National Selfie Day on Twitter MORE (S.C.) — He probably won’t run but will be discussed as a possible No. 2 on the ticket.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder — He faces a challenging reelection race in November.

Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneFour GOP senators will vote against taking up healthcare bill without changes Week ahead in tech: Lawmakers turn focus to self-driving cars Senate panel unveils aviation bill with consumer protections, drone fix MORE (S.D.) — Thune nearly ran in 2012, and he has more than $9.5 million in his campaign war chest.

Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump sends FBI director nomination to the Senate Alec Baldwin's Trump will return to SNL Carter Page questioned in FBI Russia investigation: report MORETrump might run, but don’t bet on it.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker — Walker first has to win reelection this year.

Allen West — The former congressman from Florida is mulling a bid.

— Vivian Hughbanks and Tomas Navia contributed.