Rep. Moran's son resigns from father's campaign amid voter fraud scandal

Patrick Moran, the son of Virginia Rep. Jim MoranJim MoranTrump can help farmers by improving two-way trade with Cuba Former GOP House veterans panel chairman goes to K Street Former reps: Increase support to Ukraine to deter Russia MORE (D-Va.) and the field director for his father's reelection bid, resigned abruptly Wednesday after a video linked him to voter fraud. 

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The video — released earlier in the day by Project Veritas, a conservative organization headed by the Republican activist James O’Keefe — revealed that the younger Moran had weighed options for helping an undercover operative cast votes on behalf of 100 people who allegedly weren't planning to vote.

"There will be a lot of voter protection, so, if they just have, you know, the utility bill or bank statement — bank statement would obviously be tough ... but faking a utility bill would be easy enough," Moran says, apparently referring to options for getting around Virginia's voter ID laws. 

Moran's campaign issued a statement confirming the congressman's son had stepped down. 

"Patrick is well liked and was a well-respected member of the campaign team. This incident, however, was clearly an error in judgment. The campaign has accepted Patrick’s resignation, effective immediately," the statement said. 

The resignation comes just a day after Rep. Moran and two other Virginia Democrats — Reps. Gerry ConnollyGerry ConnollyFirst federal agency gets 'A' grade in IT report card Washingtonians take center stage at Will on the Hill Dem rep: Abuse, violence against the press 'hallmarks in Trump era' MORE and Bobby ScottBobby ScottKids shouldn't be charged as sex offenders Overnight Finance: Dems introduce minimum wage bill | Sanders clashes with Trump budget chief | Border tax proposal at death's door Sanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill MORE — had urged the Justice Department to launch an investigation into Strategic Allied Consulting, a GOP firm linked to separate allegations of voter registration fraud in Virginia and Florida.

"The number of allegations in a multitude of locations would seem to suggest something more than the isolated acts of 'a few bad apples,' " the lawmakers wrote Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Eric HolderEric H. HolderOvernight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns Holder mulling 2020 bid MORE.    

Moran's congressional office deflected questions about the lawmaker's son to the campaign office.