Rep. Moran's son resigns from father's campaign amid voter fraud scandal

Patrick Moran, the son of Virginia Rep. Jim MoranJim MoranFormer reps: Increase support to Ukraine to deter Russia GOP Rep. Comstock holds on to Virginia House seat 10 races Democrats must win to take the House MORE (D-Va.) and the field director for his father's reelection bid, resigned abruptly Wednesday after a video linked him to voter fraud. 

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The video — released earlier in the day by Project Veritas, a conservative organization headed by the Republican activist James O’Keefe — revealed that the younger Moran had weighed options for helping an undercover operative cast votes on behalf of 100 people who allegedly weren't planning to vote.

"There will be a lot of voter protection, so, if they just have, you know, the utility bill or bank statement — bank statement would obviously be tough ... but faking a utility bill would be easy enough," Moran says, apparently referring to options for getting around Virginia's voter ID laws. 

Moran's campaign issued a statement confirming the congressman's son had stepped down. 

"Patrick is well liked and was a well-respected member of the campaign team. This incident, however, was clearly an error in judgment. The campaign has accepted Patrick’s resignation, effective immediately," the statement said. 

The resignation comes just a day after Rep. Moran and two other Virginia Democrats — Reps. Gerry ConnollyGerry ConnollyHouse Oversight grills law enforcement on facial recognition tech Overnight Cybersecurity: White House says Trump confident DOJ will hand over wiretapping evidence | Dems push for surveillance law reform DC Metro rushed into yearlong repair program, watchdog finds MORE and Bobby ScottBobby ScottThe Hill's 12:30 Report A guide to the committees: House Repeal without replacement: A bad strategy for kids MORE — had urged the Justice Department to launch an investigation into Strategic Allied Consulting, a GOP firm linked to separate allegations of voter registration fraud in Virginia and Florida.

"The number of allegations in a multitude of locations would seem to suggest something more than the isolated acts of 'a few bad apples,' " the lawmakers wrote Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Eric HolderEric H. HolderOvernight Tech: Senate moving to kill FCC's internet privacy rules | Bill Gates pushes for foreign aid | Verizon, AT&T pull Google ads | Q&A with IBM's VP for cyber threat intel Uber leadership sticking by CEO Top Dems prep for future while out of the spotlight MORE.    

Moran's congressional office deflected questions about the lawmaker's son to the campaign office.