Female senators urge Warren: Back Hillary Clinton

Female senators urge Warren: Back Hillary Clinton
© Greg Nash

Female Democratic senators are privately urging Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump's SEC may negate investors' ability to fight securities fraud Schatz's ignorance of our Anglo-American legal heritage illustrates problem with government Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee MORE to formally endorse Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE for president.

The lobbying campaign comes as the Democratic race between Clinton and Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE (I-Vt.) is heating up going into the New Hampshire primary next week. 

A group of Democratic ­senators is taking a bus tour of New Hampshire this weekend to stump for Clinton, and they want the liberal Massachusetts powerhouse to get on board. Clinton narrowly defeated Sanders in the Iowa caucuses earlier this week, but the Vermont senator is a heavy favorite to win New Hampshire.

A few of the senators have discussed with Warren the possibility of publicly backing Clinton. However, they’ve been careful not to put a lot of public pressure on their colleague, who is fiercely independent and has a loyal following among progressives.

“I’m hopeful she’ll join us. I’m hopeful she’ll join the revolution that will allow us to come together to elect” the first female president, said Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann Stabenow10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country At least Alzheimer’s research is bringing Washington together Senate Dems block crackdown on sanctuary cities MORE (D-Mich.), one of Clinton’s staunchest supporters.

Asked if she or other senators had approached Warren personally, Stabenow said, “We all talk about it,” but declined to reveal what Warren has said in response.

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Robert Mueller's forgotten surveillance crime spree Clinton: White House slow-walking Russia sanctions MORE (Md.), the dean of the Senate’s Democratic women, has also talked to Warren about backing Clinton.

“I’ve told Sen. Warren that we would welcome her anytime she’s ready,” she said.

Warren is the only female Democratic senator who has not endorsed Clinton.

Mikulski indicated she is not making a hard sell. She’s more focused on revving up Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire and South Carolina.

“I’m going up to New Hampshire to be on a bus tour with [Clinton] on Friday. Many of the Democratic women of the Senate are going to do that. And we’re getting ready to organize another tour in South Carolina,” she said.

Warren declined to comment in the Capitol Wednesday, and her office did not return a request for comment.

An endorsement from Warren would be very valuable now. Sanders is leading Clinton by double digits in New Hampshire, where Warren has a higher profile than in most states because it’s part of the Boston media market.

Clinton is likely to pick up the endorsement of Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who was the first female Speaker. Pelosi, who is revered by progressives, told The Hill on Tuesday she will endorse in the primary, and all indications suggest she will back the former first lady. 

Warren, meanwhile, has been coy. 

This week, Warren told reporters, “No endorsements now.” She said she is proud that her party’s White House hopefuls are focusing on the issues voters care about. Asked if she’d endorse a candidate following the Iowa caucuses, Warren responded, “We’ll see.”

Clinton has labored to compete with Sanders for liberal activists and young voters, two blocs that helped then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaOvernight Energy: Dems ask Pruitt to justify first-class travel | Obama EPA chief says reg rollback won't stand | Ex-adviser expects Trump to eventually rejoin Paris accord Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Ex-US ambassador: Mueller is the one who is tough on Russia MORE (Ill.) defeat her in the 2008 presidential primary. Warren, an idealist who often takes on Wall Street interests aggressively, is popular with those voters.

A Democratic aide said the Senate women have been “trying to do a little arm twisting in recent months.”

“Her role in this campaign would be valuable,” the staffer said. “I think she’s gotten more attention than most senators, and I think it would mean a lot.”

Other women in the Senate have thrown themselves wholeheartedly into the campaign for Clinton, which they see as a historic opportunity to advance women’s rights.

Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAmerican women will decide who wins and loses in 2018 elections Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Calls mount from Dems to give platform to Trump accusers  MORE (D-N.Y.) and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: VA chief won't resign | Dem wants probe into VA hacking claim | Trump official denies plan for 'bloody nose' N. Korea strike | General '100 percent' confident in US missile defense Trump official denies US planning 'bloody nose' strike on North Korea House Oversight Committee opens probe into sexual abuse of gymnasts MORE (D-N.H.) said they would also participate on the New Hampshire bus tour.

“I’m heading up Thursday night. We’ll have a bus of women senators traveling around the state doing campaign events, and I’m really excited about it,” said Gillibrand, who is seen as a possible future presidential candidate. 

Democratic Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Dems seek reversal of nursing home regulatory rollback MORE (Minn.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinAmerican women will decide who wins and loses in 2018 elections Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees 10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country MORE (Wis.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMcCaskill welcomes ninth grandson in a row Dem group launches M ad buy to boost vulnerable senators Senate Dems block crackdown on sanctuary cities MORE (Mo.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDem senators want list of White House officials with interim security clearances Dems send letter probing Kelly, McGahn over Porter allegations Dems call for probe into security clearances after WH aide resignation MORE (Hawaii), Gillibrand and Stabenow campaigned for Clinton in Iowa. Gillibrand and McCaskill have also campaigned for her in Nevada.

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerKamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response Billionaire Steyer to push for Dem House push MORE (D-Calif.) is planning to attend fundraisers for Clinton in her home state.

Some female senators say they haven’t pressed Warren.

“I think Elizabeth will make her decision when she wants to make her decision. I don’t think it affects Hillary’s candidacy at all,” Gillibrand said.

Rep. Dina Titus (D-Nev.), a longtime Clinton supporter, said while she hadn’t heard of the backroom conversations, “I think they are trying to get endorsements from as many people as they can get. She’s kind of a media darling, a real populist ... and having her endorsement would be a good thing.”

“I think it meant a lot to have her endorsement on the plan to reform Wall Street,” she said, adding that it was a good first step. 

Clinton and Warren are two of the brightest lights of the Democratic Party, both with loyal followings. But their relationship has run warm and cold over the years.

Liberal activists tried to draft Warren to run for president against Clinton this year, despite many protestations that she was not interested.

In early 2013, Warren along with the rest of the Democratic women in the Senate signed a letter urging Clinton to run for president, but she has since clarified that it did not signify an endorsement.

Warren and Clinton have disagreed most pointedly on issues affecting Wall Street, which Clinton used to represent when she served as New York’s junior senator from 2001 to 2008.

Warren told journalist Bill Moyers in a 2004 interview that Clinton flip-flopped on key bankruptcy legislation after winning election to the Senate. 

As first lady in the late 1990s, Clinton helped persuade President Clinton to veto the bill, which Warren argued at the time would hurt single mothers. But once Clinton was representing New York’s financial services industry in Congress, she voted for it.

“As Sen. Clinton, the pressures are very different. It’s a well-financed industry,” Warren told Moyers. “She has taken money from the groups, and more to the point, she worries about them as a constituency.”

Their relationship was sufficiently tense that Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonShould the Rob Porter outcome set the standard? Make the compromise: Ending chain migration is a small price to legalize Dreamers Assessing Trump's impeachment odds through a historic lens MORE did not campaign for Warren when she ran for the Senate against then-Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) in 2012. The former president offered his support with an email fundraising solicitation, but he declined to appear with her in person.