OPIOID SERIES:

House Dems show better first-quarter fundraising than at-risk Republicans

House Democrats are winning the early round of the 2013 fundraising battle over a number of at-risk Republicans.

Several House Republicans facing potentially tough reelection campaigns reported lackluster results in first-quarter filings with the Federal Election Commission, which were due Monday.

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Those stragglers could prove a headache for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) as it fights to prevent Democrats from picking up seats — or winning back the House — in the 2014 midterms.

“This should be a wake-up call to Republican members,” one GOP strategist told The Hill.

“They need to step it up if they want to keep the majority and keep [Rep.] Nancy Pelosi [D-Calif.] out of the Speaker’s chair.”

Reps. Gary Miller (R-Calif.) and David Valadao (R-Calif.), who both face challenging reelection prospects in Democratic-leaning districts, each raised less than $100,000 for the quarter.

Valadao has less than $140,000 on hand and is carrying $40,000 in debt, while Miller has $415,000 in the bank.

Rep. Kerry BentivolioKerry BentivolioIndiana Republican: Leaders duped me Reindeer farmer saves 'cromnibus' with yes vote High drama as .1T spending package advances by one vote MORE (R-Mich.), who could be forced to fight tough primary and general election races, barely topped $40,000, and has just $36,000 in the bank. 

Rep. Steve Southerland (R-Fla.) brought in just over $40,000 in the slightly Republican-leaning district. 

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-N.Y.) raised less than $30,000, though he has the ability to self-fund his campaigns.

Other Republicans facing potentially competitive races are off to slow starts for the fundraising cycle.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.), a top Democratic target, raised less than $160,000. Rep. Dan BenishekDaniel (Dan) Joseph BenishekRepublican groups launch final ad blitz in key House battlegrounds Tea Party class reassesses record Michigan Republican to retire MORE (R-Mich.) raised less than $140,000, and Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio) raised less than $90,000, although he has nearly $290,000 cash on hand.

Reps. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfBolton could be the first national security chief to prioritize religious freedom House votes to mandate sexual harassment training for members and staff Trump, global religious freedom needs US ambassador to lead MORE (R-Va.) and Bill Young (R-Fla.) each raised $50,000.

Both longtime congressmen have had little problem holding onto their swing seats, but retirement rumors have swirled around them for years, and — if they do leave office — those seats could be very competitive.

Rep. Rick CrawfordRichard (Rick) CrawfordWhy DOJ must block the Cigna-Express Scripts merger Elvis impersonator named Elvis Presley running for Congress Overnight Tech: Senate Dems want FCC chief recused from Sinclair merger | Tech rallies on Capitol Hill for DACA | Facebook beefs up lobbying ranks MORE (R-Ark.), who Democrats hope to target despite his district’s conservative lean, raised just $60,000. Rep. Larry BucshonLarry Dean BucshonCombatting our opioid crisis with comprehensive treatment centers Fix 340B drug discount program to increase patient access to treatment Bailing out the coal industry at the expense of the taxpayer MORE (R-Ind.) brought in less than $140,000.

There were a few GOP standouts, however.

Rep. Tom Latham (R-Iowa), a close ally of Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerSome doubt McCarthy or Scalise will ever lead House GOP Lobbying World McCarthy courts conservatives in Speaker's bid MORE (R-Ohio), hauled in more than $300,000. Freshman Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.), a top Democratic target, brought in more than $400,000, while Rep. Jim GerlachJames (Jim) GerlachPa. GOP 'disappointed' by rep retiring after filing deadline Pennsylvania Republican Costello won't seek reelection Republican Pa. congressman won't seek reelection: report MORE (R-Pa.) topped $300,000.

The overall pattern of GOP underperformance was mirrored at the national level.

The NRCC has lagged behind the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee this year; it had $4.4 million in the bank to the DCCC’s $7.6 million as of the end of February.

“Republicans in Congress are finding the same problem with donors that polls show they have with voters — no one likes them,” said Jesse Ferguson, communications director for the DCCC.

Some Democrats had poor fundraising quarters.

Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D-N.H.), a perennially weak fundraiser, brought in less than $90,000 and has just over $70,000 in her campaign account.

Rep. Mike McIntyre (D-N.C.), a top GOP target in a heavily Republican district, raised just $120,000.

Reps. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.), Dave Loebsack (D-Iowa) and Tim Walz (D-Minn.) all barely topped $100,000, though all three have won comfortably in their swing districts in previous years.

Rep. Nick RahallNick Joe RahallWe shouldn't allow politics to impede disaster relief Break the cycle of partisanship with infant, child health care programs Clinton mulls role in 2018 midterms MORE (D-W.Va.) brought in just $140,000.

However, many more Democrats posted big hauls.

Freshman Reps. Patrick Murphy (D-Fla.), Joe GarciaJose (Joe) Antonio GarciaCurbelo Dem rival lashes out over immigration failure Hispanic Caucus to invite Republicans to join Vulnerable House incumbents build up war chests MORE (D-Fla.) and Sean Maloney (D-N.Y.) all topped $500,000.

Rep. John BarrowJohn Jenkins BarrowOur democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech MORE (D-Ga.), who holds a heavily Republican seat and is mulling a Senate run, brought in $420,000.

Freshman Reps. Brad Schneider (D-Ill.), Raul Ruiz (D-Calif.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Ann McLane Kuster (D-N.H.), all potential targets, topped $300,000 apiece. Reps. Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickGold Star father attacked by Trump steps up role in Dem primaries House Dems highlight promising new candidates Vulnerable House incumbents build up war chests MORE (D-Ariz.) and Dan Maffei (D-N.Y.), now in their second terms after 2012 victories, also cleared the $300,000 bar.

Some early Democratic recruits got off to fast starts as well. Former Colorado state House Speaker Andrew Romanoff (D) brought in more than $500,000 and has a $100,000 cash advantage over Rep. Mike Coffman (R-Colo.), who also topped $500,000 for the quarter.

New York Democrat Sean Eldridge brought in more than $300,000, doubling Rep. Chris Gibson’s (R-N.Y.) $130,000 in fundraising for the quarter.

New York City Councilman Domenic Recchia (D) raised more than $410,000, outpacing Rep. Michael Grimm’s (R-N.Y.) $320,000.