Sanders: Dems must move beyond 'identity politics'

Sanders: Dems must move beyond 'identity politics'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersA case for open borders and how it can boost the world economy Sen. Sanders: 'Hypocrite' Trump rants against undocumented immigrants, but hires them at his properties On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump floats tariffs on European cars | Nikki Haley slams UN report on US poverty | Will tax law help GOP? It's a mystery MORE (I-Vt.) said Sunday that the Democratic Party must move beyond “identity politics” in order to connect with a larger share of the voting public.

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"It is not good enough for somebody to say, 'I'm a woman, vote for me.' That is not good enough," Sanders told a crowd at the Berklee Performance Center in Boston, according to WBUR. "What we need is a woman who has the guts to stand up to Wall Street, to the insurance companies, to the drug companies, to the fossil fuel industries.”

Sanders, who come in second place to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonColorado governor teases possible presidential run Mueller asks judge for September sentencing for Papadopoulos House Judiciary Committee subpoenas FBI agent who sent anti-Trump texts MORE for the Democratic presidential nomination this year, has repeatedly voiced his concerns with the party’s lack of support in middle America.

"The working class of this country is being decimated — that's why Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP lawmakers preparing to vote on bill allowing migrant children to be detained longer than 20 days: report Wasserman Schultz: Infants separated from their parents are in Florida immigrant shelters Ex-White House ethics chief: Sarah Sanders tweet violates ethics laws MORE won," the senator said. "And what we need now are candidates who stand with those working people, who understand that real median family income has gone down."

The Vermont independent, who was named chair of outreach among the Democratic Senate leadership this month, has said the party must shift its focus to winning back blue-collar workers and the economically disaffected.

“I come from the white working class, and I am deeply humiliated that the Democratic Party cannot talk to the people where I came from,” he wrote on Twitter last week.