Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination

Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination
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Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenTech companies earn White House praise for committing to easier health data access Biden honors Heather Heyer: She is 'in every person who stands up to reject hatred and bigotry' Avenatti on 2020 campaign: 'The truth is my policy issue' MORE and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems make history, and other takeaways from Tuesday's primaries Ellison wins Minnesota AG primary amid late domestic violence allegations Ironworker and star of viral video wins Dem primary for Speaker Ryan's seat MORE lead the field of potential Democratic presidential nominees in 2020, a Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey released Tuesday shows. 

When Democratic voters are asked to pick from a field of nine Democratic candidates, 31 percent pick the vice president and 24 percent favor the Vermont senator to be the Democratic nominee.

On the other hand, the PPP survey also found that Democratic voters want a younger candidate who hasn't run for president before. Sanders and Biden are both in their 70s and have run for the White House before. 

Another 16 percent of poll respondents said they would vote for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenCanadian corporate tax cuts show success of strong economic policy Avenatti on 2020 campaign: 'The truth is my policy issue' Democrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America MORE (D-Mass.) if she ran, while 14 percent were undecided. 

Other candidates mentioned have low support.

Only 4 percent of those surveyed said they would vote for New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, while 2 percent each said they would pick Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s GOP feuds dominate ahead of midterms Dustbin 2020: The best Dems who surely won’t get the nomination Vulnerable Dems side with Warren in battle over consumer bureau MORE, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro. 

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Meanwhile, Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenDems make history, and other takeaways from Tuesday's primaries Tina Smith defeats former Bush ethics lawyer in Minnesota Dem primary The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s GOP feuds dominate ahead of midterms MORE and New York Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America Border patrol chief: Calls to abolish ICE impact the morale of my team Kamala Harris tied with Bernie Sanders as betting favorite for 2020 Dems MORE received 3 percent support each for the nomination.

With the 2020 election nearly four years away, early polls generally only show which candidates have the strongest name recognition, which would explain while Biden, Sanders and Warren are emerging as top picks for Democratic voters. 

PPP notes that Booker, Cuomo, Castro, Brown and Gillibrand all have less than 50 percent name recognition with Democrats nationally. 

In 2012, polls gave Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDems make history, and other takeaways from Tuesday's primaries Establishment-backed Vukmir wins Wisconsin GOP Senate primary Florida questions Senate chairman over claim that Russians have ‘penetrated’ election systems MORE (R-Fla.) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) large advantages, though they both ended their presidential bids early in the year. 

However, polls also showed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDems make history, and other takeaways from Tuesday's primaries Establishment-backed Vukmir wins Wisconsin GOP Senate primary Ironworker and star of viral video wins Dem primary for Speaker Ryan's seat MORE dominating the field of prospective Democratic candidates, which she won despite a strong challenge from Sanders. 

Fifty-seven percent of Democrats polled said they want their candidate to be under the age of 60, and 77 percent said they want their candidate to be younger than 70. 

Biden and Sanders are 74 and 75, respectively. 

Only 25 percent of Democrats said they want their candidate to be someone who has run for president before, while 41 prefer someone who hasn't, and 34 percent said they are not sure one way or the other. 

“There’s a tension for Democrats nationally,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling. “They want new blood, but their most well known and popular figures don’t exactly fit that mold. Of course they have a long time to get that all figured out.” 

The poll surveyed 400 Democratic primary voters on Dec. 6 and 7, and has a margin of error of 4.9 percentage points.