Report: Too many votes registered in Detroit precincts

Report: Too many votes registered in Detroit precincts

Voting machines in 37 percent of Detroit's precincts registered too many votes in the presidential election last month, the Detroit News reported Tuesday.

Records from Wayne County show optical scanners in 248 of the city's 662 precincts registered more ballots than the number of votes tallied in the poll books.

The city's voting irregularities prompted a call for an audit by Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson's office, according to the publication.

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President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Trump Jr. declines further Secret Service protection: report Report: Mueller warned Manafort to expect an indictment MORE won Michigan by 10,704 votes, but Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE received more votes in Detroit and Wayne County.

The state's recount effort ended Friday after a decision by the Michigan Supreme Court.

Detroit precincts were among some of the precincts that couldn't be counted during the presidential recount because of a state law that bars the precincts from being recounted if the numbers don't match, unless there's a valid explanation.

In Detroit, the discrepancies resulted in 392 precincts that couldn't be counted. Two-thirds of those precincts had too many votes, according to the Detroit News. 

“There’s always going to be small problems to some degree, but we didn’t expect the degree of problem we saw in Detroit,” said Krista Haroutunian, chairwoman of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers.

"This isn’t normal."

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein pushed for recounts in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, but has been facing several hurdles.