Trump loses 2 electoral votes because of 'faithless' electors

Trump loses 2 electoral votes because of 'faithless' electors
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Two "faithless electors" from Texas refused to vote for President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump returns to White House after first trip abroad White House: Trump trip left no doubt 'who America’s friends are' Trump 'willing to deal well' with France, says Macron MORE on Monday, leaving his official Electoral College vote two shy of what he earned on Election Night.  

Despite a concerted push from liberals to convince Republican electors to go rogue, all remained united around their party's nominee until Texas, the final Republican state to report results. 
 
All but two of Texas' 38 electors followed suit. One elector, Dallas's Christopher Suprun, had already declared his intent to vote for Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich, who briefly emerged as a compromise pick for anti-Trump electors before rejecting their support. Suprun followed through on that pledge.
 
But a second elector chose to back former Texas Republican Rep. Ron Paul instead of Trump. 
 
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That brings Trump's Electoral College vote total to 304, two shy of the 306 he would have won without the defections. 
 
Texas conducts its electoral votes by a secret ballot, so the identity of the second defector will be unknown unless he or she comes forward. 
 
The defections bothered Texas Gov. Greg Abbott. He tweeted moments after the vote that he will push the legislature to pass a bill to bind electors to the state's popular vote winner during the next legislative session, which begins in January. 
 
There was slightly more unity during the vice presidential vote. Republican Vice President-elect Mike PenceMike (Michael) Richard PenceColbert imagines Trump’s postcards home during foreign trip Trump and Russia: A timeline on communications Trump tries to patch things up with Comey in latest 'Simpsons' short MORE won 37 of the 38 votes, with the final vote going to former Hewlett-Packard executive Carly Fiorina. Fiorina had run for the GOP presidential nomination and eventually joined up with Ted CruzTed CruzFranken explains why he made an exception to diss Cruz in his book FEC faults Cruz on Goldman Sachs loans in rare unanimous vote CBO score underlines GOP tensions on ObamaCare repeal MORE's campaign as his prospective vice-presidential pick, only to see Cruz lose the primary to Trump.
 
While some prominent liberals, activists and celebrities pushed Republicans to dump Trump, it turned out that more Democrats chose not to back their party's nominee, Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton condemns 'racist abuse' in Portland attack Clinton returns to election night convention hall to talk about her new book Biden jabs at Trump in Cornell commencement speech MORE
 
Three Washington state electors chose to vote for former Secretary of State Colin Powell, presumably in response to the push for Democrats to unite around a compromise Republican that wasn't Trump. And one additional Washington elector voted for Faith Spotted Eagle, a Native American activist. 
 
Three other Democrats—one in Maine, Colorado and Minnesota—had attempted to vote for another candidate. Two were replaced based on state laws that bind electors to the popular vote result, while one changed his mind.