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Former Gov. O'Malley tests 2020 waters with poll

Former Gov. O'Malley tests 2020 waters with poll
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A political action committee affiliated with former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley polled Democratic caucus voters in Iowa, suggesting that the failed 2016 presidential contender might be considering trying again in 2020. 

O’Malley’s leadership PAC commissioned a Public Policy Polling survey earlier this month, according a POLITICO report.

Politico reports O’Malley lead the other potential Democratic candidates with 18 percent of the vote. Other candidates included Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAmerican women will decide who wins and loses in 2018 elections Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Calls mount from Dems to give platform to Trump accusers  MORE (D-N.Y.), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Dems seek reversal of nursing home regulatory rollback MORE (D-Minn.) and well-known business leaders like Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. 

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While most of the other candidates received less than 10 percent of the vote, Booker followed close behind O’Malley with 17 percent, while Klobuchar received 11 percent. Nearly a third of the polled Iowans voted “not sure.”

The poll didn't include other high-profile potential Democratic hopefuls, including Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump's SEC may negate investors' ability to fight securities fraud Schatz's ignorance of our Anglo-American legal heritage illustrates problem with government Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves Dem senator shares photo praising LeBron James after Laura Ingraham attacks Trump gets recommendation for steep curbs on imported steel, risking trade war MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE (I-Vt.)

Presidential hopefuls often focus on Iowa because, as the first contest in the Democratic primary, it can provide momentum for candidates in a crowded field.

O’Malley ran for the Democratic nomination in 2016, but he dropped out of the race after receiving little support in a race that became defined by the fight between Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE and Sanders.

Dave Hamrick, O’Malley’s 2016 campaign manager, suggested that the poll would test whether the candidate had garnered support in Iowa during the 2016 election.

“Governor O’Malley spent a lot of time in Iowa during the campaign and made a very favorable impression on Iowa Democrats. We wanted to see if the conversations he started with Iowans resonated and are glad to learn that they did,” Hamrick said.