Dem challenging Paul Ryan raises $430K in campaign's first 12 days

Dem challenging Paul Ryan raises $430K in campaign's first 12 days
© Greg Nash

Randy Bryce, a Democrat challenging House Speaker Paul RyanPaul RyanThe Hill Interview: Budget Chair Black sticks around for now Gun proposal picks up GOP support GOP lawmaker Tim Murphy to retire at end of term MORE (R-Wis.) for his seat, raised more than $430,000 in the first 12 days of his campaign. 

That money, according to Bryce's campaign, came from more than 16,000 donations, amounting to an average contribution of a little more than $25.

Bryce, a labor activist and ironworker who stumped for Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Clip shows Larry David and Bernie Sanders reacting after discovering they're related For now, Trump dossier creates more questions than answers MORE (I-Vt.) during his 2016 presidential bid, launched his congressional campaign last month. 

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“Just a few weeks into this race, we have seen what can happen when you have the power of working people on your side, and I am excited to work with everyone as we continue this fight through next November,” Bryce said in a statement.

Bryce's campaign pulled in more than $100,000 in just over 24 hours after declaring his candidacy. 

Bryce will face off against two other Democrats, political activist David Yankovich and Janesville School Board member Cathy Myers, in the district's Democratic primary early next year.

Any Democrat challenging Ryan to represent Wisconsin's 1st District is likely to face a tough election battle. The House Speaker has held the seat for nearly 20 years and is among the most well-connected and influential Republicans in the country.

What's more, Speakers of the House are rarely voted out by their constituents. The last to be turned out was Tom Foley (D-Wash.), who lost his reelection bid in 1994.

Bryce and other Democrats are hoping to capitalize on President Trump's poor poll numbers to mount competitive races in Republican-held districts.