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Ala. Senate candidate Moore appears to be against new ObamaCare bill

Roy Moore, the Republican former Alabama judge running for the open Senate seat in his state, appears to be against the GOP's latest effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare, a decision that would widen the rift between the possible senator and Senate Republican leadership.

When asked whether Moore would vote for the bill, nicknamed for the two Senators spearheading the push, a campaign spokesperson told MSNBC that "If Graham/Cassidy is anything less than a full repeal, Judge Moore will not vote for it."

The Hill confirmed Moore's stance with his campaign, but Moore's spokeswoman did not respond to a request to elaborate as to whether Moore believes Graham-Cassidy qualifies as a "full repeal."

The bill, promoted by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.), represents a major overhaul of ObamaCare.

Generally, it turns health care funding into block grants given to the states, which would be given broad leeway to set up health care exchanges how they see fit.

In the process, integral pieces of ObamaCare (like the Medicaid expansion) would be slashed. However, many conservatives have said it falls short of a full repeal because it shifts $1 trillion of the law's funding to the states.

Moore's rival in Tuesday's primary runoff, Sen. Luther Strange (R-Ala.), hasn't publicly declared a stance on the bill. But he's expected to support the bill along with the vast majority of Republican senators.

Moore has spent the entire Senate campaign at odds with Senate Republican leadership, which is backing Strange. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has been Strange's chief supporter, rallying Republican groups and President Trump into a unified effort behind him. McConnell's allied super PAC, Senate Leadership Fund, has also dumped millions into the race to boost Strange.

That infighting has prompted Moore to attack McConnell and establishment Republicans on the stump, warning that he would refuse to fall in line with what he views as the Washington insiders.

The Graham-Cassidy repeal effort has a razor-thin margin of error. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) has already said he will vote no on the measure which means that Republican leadership can only lose one more GOP vote and still get the 50 needed for Vice President Pence to be the tiebreaker.

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