Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station

Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station
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GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore and his wife will ride horses to their Alabama polling location on Tuesday.

A schedule released by the Moore campaign for the Dec. 12 election includes “Traditional Horseback Ride to their Polling Location."

Moore and his wife, Kayla, typically ride horses to every election where Moore is a candidate. They rode horseback to the Alabama run-off, where Moore beat out Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeCrowley surprise tops huge night for left Races to watch in Tuesday’s primaries Loyalty to Donald Trump is new normal for the Republican Party MORE to be the GOP nominee, and to the first round of the GOP primary in August.

Most recent polls have put Moore ahead of opponent Democrat Doug Jones for the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsConservatives moving to impeach Rosenstein soon: report Senators urge DOJ to probe whether Russians posed as Islamic extremist hackers to harass US military families The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies for Putin summit: 'He’s not my enemy’ MORE, despite a series of allegations that he sexually assaulted teenage girls.

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Nine women have come forward with accusations that Moore pursued them either romantically or sexually when they were teenagers and he was in his twenties and thirties, including one who said he had a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 years old and he was 32.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSasse: Trump shouldn't dignify Putin with Helsinki summit Top LGBT group projects message onto Presidential Palace in Helsinki ahead of Trump-Putin summit Hillary Clinton to Trump ahead of Putin summit: 'Do you know which team you play for?' MORE has thrown his support behind Moore, and several GOP lawmakers have said it is up to the people of Alabama to decide, with some walking back previous calls for Moore to withdraw from the race.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP leaders jockey for affection of House conservatives Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump walks back criticism of UK Brexit strategy | McConnell worries US in 'early stages' of trade war | US trade deficit with China hits new record MORE (R-Wis.) on Thursday reiterated his call for Moore to step down, just as Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenFranken offers Dems a line of questioning for Kavanaugh's 'weirdly specific bit of bulls---' The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix Richard Painter puts out 'dumpster fire' in first campaign ad MORE (D-Minn.) was announcing his own resignation from the Senate over sexual misconduct allegations.