Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station

Roy Moore to ride horseback to polling station
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GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore and his wife will ride horses to their Alabama polling location on Tuesday.

A schedule released by the Moore campaign for the Dec. 12 election includes “Traditional Horseback Ride to their Polling Location."

Moore and his wife, Kayla, typically ride horses to every election where Moore is a candidate. They rode horseback to the Alabama run-off, where Moore beat out Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe Trump Presidency: Year One Dems search for winning playbook Stephen Bannon steps down from Breitbart MORE to be the GOP nominee, and to the first round of the GOP primary in August.

Most recent polls have put Moore ahead of opponent Democrat Doug Jones for the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsUnder pressure, Trump shifts blame for Russia intrusion Overnight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand MORE, despite a series of allegations that he sexually assaulted teenage girls.

Nine women have come forward with accusations that Moore pursued them either romantically or sexually when they were teenagers and he was in his twenties and thirties, including one who said he had a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 years old and he was 32.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE has thrown his support behind Moore, and several GOP lawmakers have said it is up to the people of Alabama to decide, with some walking back previous calls for Moore to withdraw from the race.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanRepublicans are avoiding gun talks as election looms The Hill's 12:30 Report Flake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan MORE (R-Wis.) on Thursday reiterated his call for Moore to step down, just as Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenShould the Rob Porter outcome set the standard? Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees Sen. Gillibrand, eyeing 2020 bid, rankles some Democrats MORE (D-Minn.) was announcing his own resignation from the Senate over sexual misconduct allegations.