Moore refuses to concede after Jones certified winner

Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreEx-Sheriff David Clarke describes how he would have stopped anti-fascists in 1930s Germany on 'Who is America' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump to GOP: I will carry you GOP strategist: Trump will be anchor around Republicans' necks in general election MORE is refusing to concede the Alabama Senate special election, even after Democratic opponent Doug Jones’s victory was made official by the state.

Moore issued a statement on Thursday reiterating his claims that voter fraud caused him to lose the election.

"Election fraud experts across the country have agreed that this was a fraudulent election,” Moore said in his statement. "I’ve had to fight not only the Democrats but also the Republican Senate Leadership Fund and over $50 million in opposition spending from the Washington establishment.”

Alabama officials certified Jones’s victory earlier Thursday, despite Moore’s claims of voter fraud.

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Moore filed a last-minute complaint late Wednesday attempting to block officials from certifying the results, but a judge rejected the challenge. Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill told CNN that his office had fully investigated the voter fraud allegations.

Moore lost to Jones earlier this month by about 1.5 points after a campaign that brought national attention for months before the Dec. 12 special election.

Moore was the front-runner to fill the Alabama Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSentencing reform deal heats up, pitting Trump against reliable allies Hill.TV poll: 41 percent of Americans want Mueller to wrap up probe before midterms The Hill's Morning Report: Dems have a majority in the Senate (this week) MORE, despite a series of accusations of sexual misconduct, including assault, involving teenage girls in the past. Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations, and he said Thursday that he took a polygraph test after the election that proves the allegations are false.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBrennan fires new shot at Trump: ‘He’s drunk on power’ Trump aides discussed using security clearance revocations to distract from negative stories: report Trump tried to dissuade Melania from 'Be Best' anti-bullying campaign: report MORE threw his support behind Moore at the last minute, even though other GOP leaders were calling for him to withdraw from the race. 

"I have stood for the truth about God and the Constitution for the people of Alabama,” Moore said in his Thursday statement. "I have no regrets. To God be the glory."