Candidate to replace Corker would welcome Trump's help on campaign trail

Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnElection Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds Lawmakers split over how to expand rural broadband MORE (R-Tenn.) said Thursday she would welcome President TrumpDonald John TrumpNFL freezes policy barring players from protesting during anthem McConnell spokesman on Putin visit: 'There is no invitation from Congress' Petition urges University of Virginia not to hire Marc Short MORE’s support in her campaign next year to replace outgoing Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSenate GOP attempts to wave Trump off second Putin summit Senate approves resolution warning Trump not to hand over US officials McConnell calls for Senate hearings on Russia sanctions MORE (Tenn.), one of Trump's most vocal GOP critics.

“President Trump is very popular in Tennessee, and people are so encouraged by the work that he has done,” Blackburn said on CNN. 

“It would probably be very helpful if he were to come,” she added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Blackburn, a staunch supporter of Trump, announced in October she will run for Senate in 2018 to fill the seat of Corker, who is retiring.

In her announcement, Blackburn said she would fight to build a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, called the Senate “totally dysfunctional” and described herself as a “card-carrying Tennessee conservative.” 

She is the front-runner for the GOP nomination, after Gov. Bill Haslam (R) decided not to enter the race. 

Blackburn, who is backed by Breitbart News chief and former Trump strategist Stephen Bannon, is likely to face former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) in the general election. The entry of Bredesen, the last Democrat to win statewide office in Tennessee, saw the Cook Political Report shift its forecast of the race to the toss-up column.

A poll from October, which the Senate Democrats' campaign arm released this month, found Bredesen leading Blackburn by 5 points, while one from a pro-Trump super PAC released the same day gave the Republican lawmaker a 9-point lead.

Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has repeatedly criticized Trump and his policies, saying in October that he would not support the president for reelection.

“I think he’s proven himself unable to rise to the occasion,” Corker told CNN.

“I don't know why he lowers himself to such a low, low standard and debases our country in the way that he does, but he does," he added. "I think the debasing of our nation ... will be what he'll be remembered most for." 

Some Republicans have been divided over whether backing from Trump, who has historically low approval ratings, would help or hurt their chances during 2018 midterm elections.

Trump backed Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeRoby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism Once a Trump critic, Ala. rep faces runoff with his support Crowley surprise tops huge night for left MORE (R-Ala.) in his primary runoff against Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreRoby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism Once a Trump critic, Ala. rep faces runoff with his support Doug Jones walks tightrope on Supreme Court nominee MORE for the Republican nomination in the Alabama Senate special election. Strange lost to Moore, who eventually earned Trump's endorsement.

Moore, who was accused of sexual misconduct, eventually lost to Democrat Doug Jones.

Trump, however, quickly distanced himself from Moore, saying he backed Strange because he knew Moore could not win the general election.

He also supported Virginia gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie (R), who lost to Democrat Ralph Northam in November. After the election, Trump said Gillespie "did not embrace me or what I stand for."

Retiring Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentLots of love: Charity tennis match features lawmakers teaming up across the aisle Ex-lawmakers see tough job market with trade groups Dem, GOP groups prepare spending blitz for midterms MORE (R-Pa.) said in an interview Sunday he believes candidates in certain parts of the country “would rather he not visit,” while others would likely benefit from Trump’s support.