Judges refuse GOP request to block new Pa. district boundaries

Judges refuse GOP request to block new Pa. district boundaries
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A panel of federal judges in Pennsylvania refused on Monday to block the state Supreme Court's new congressional map from going into effect, dealing a blow to Republicans who had sought to block it. 
 
Top Republican officials in the state had joined with Republican members of the state's congressional delegation to challenge the new map, which was drawn by the state Supreme Court after it struck down the old map as an unconstitutional gerrymander. 
 
Those plaintiffs — including Pennsylvania Republican Reps. Lou BarlettaLouis (Lou) James BarlettaTop Koch official fires back at critics: We are not an 'appendage' of the GOP Dem senator: Media should stop covering Trump rallies like they're breaking news The Hill's Morning Report: Trump tries to rescue Ohio House seat as GOP midterm fears grow MORE, Ryan CostelloRyan Anthony CostellloDems eyeing smaller magic number for House majority House GOP starts summer break on a note of friction Overnight Energy: Proposed rule would roll back endangered species protections | House passes Interior, EPA spending | House votes to disavow carbon tax MORE, Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyA numbers game: Employers need 'Cadillac Tax' relief On The Money: Commerce to review uranium imports | Lawmakers urge Trump not to impose auto tariffs | White House wants steeper cuts to EPA funding | Google hit with massive B fine Auto industry groups, lawmakers urge Trump administration to avoid tariffs on auto imports MORE, Tom MarinoThomas (Tom) Anthony Marino'Paws for Celebration' event brings rescue animals to the Capitol In the shadow of another epidemic, we must protect our children Republicans refuse to back opioids bill sponsored by vulnerable Dem MORE, Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryCook Political Report moves 4 GOP seats to 'toss-up' category Conservative group pledges .5 million for 12 House GOP candidates Lawmaker lists fake Sacha Baron Cohen award on campaign site MORE, Keith RothfusKeith James RothfusConservative group pledges .5 million for 12 House GOP candidates Election handicapper moves GOP leader's race to 'toss-up' Buckle your seatbelts for 100 days of political drama before midterms MORE, Lloyd SmuckerLloyd K. SmuckerTime to halt the growing ‘skills gap’ leaving middle-class jobs unfilled Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Judges refuse GOP request to block new Pa. district boundaries MORE and Glenn ThompsonGlenn (G.T.) W. ThompsonLawmakers clash over future of coal Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Trump officials move to expand non-ObamaCare health plans | 'Zero tolerance' policy stirs fears in health community | New ObamaCare repeal plan Tensions on immigration erupt in the House GOP MORE — took issue with the three-week timeline the state court gave the GOP-controlled legislature and the Democratic governor to reach an agreement before stepping in to draw the lines itself. They argued that the window was too short and that the entire process violated the state legislature's right to draw the lines. 
 
But the three-judge panel with the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania ruled against those lawmakers and declined to block the new maps from being implemented before the state's May primary. 
 
"The Plaintiffs' frustration with the process by which the Pennsylvania Supreme Court implemented its own redistricting map is plain," the judges wrote in their opinion. 
 
"But frustration, even frustration emanating from arduous time constraints placed on the legislative process, does not accord the Plaintiffs a right to relief."
 
The new lines have been seen as a boon for Democrats, who stand to benefit electorally. Right now, the party has control of just five congressional seats in the state compared to 13 controlled by Republicans, even though Pennsylvania is seen as a swing state and regularly elects Democrats statewide.
 
The new map drawn by the court would expand Democratic opportunities in a handful of districts — the nonpartisan election analysts at Cook Political Report lists seven Republican-held seats on its list of the most competitive races in the country.
 
One of those seats, currently held by retiring Rep. Pat MeehanPatrick (Pat) Leo MeehanDems eyeing smaller magic number for House majority Overnight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus Three Republicans join climate change caucus MORE, is listed as a "likely Democratic" victory in 2018. Three more are considered toss-ups, while three others are subsequently listed as "likely Republican." 
 
The court ruling limits Republican recourse as they try to block the maps from taking effect, but the party still has options. The plaintiffs can appeal to the federal 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals. And Republicans also have an emergency suit pending at the U.S. Supreme Court, but it's unclear when the court would act on that challenge.