Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates

Boehner to campaign for House GOP candidates
© Greg Nash

Former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFreedom Caucus members see openings in leadership Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus Ex-lawmakers see tough job market with trade groups MORE (R-Ohio) will travel the country this summer to campaign for House Republicans ahead of this year's midterm elections.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFreedom Caucus members see openings in leadership Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus Ex-lawmakers see tough job market with trade groups MORE plans to make at least seven stops on a bus tour starting in August, CNN reported Tuesday. The cross-country jaunt will mirror the bus tours he took while serving as a congressman and as Speaker.

“He likes getting out among the people, mixing it up and feeling the pulse of the nation, while supporting his former colleagues and the next generation of leaders,” Dave Schnittger, a spokesman for Boehner, told CNN.

ADVERTISEMENT

“This summer there’s both a demand for it and a renewed desire on his part,” he added.

Boehner represented a district in southwest Ohio for more than two decades. He served as Speaker from 2011 until his resignation in October 2015.

Since leaving Congress, Boehner has maintained a relatively low profile. He was the subject of a wide-ranging Politico profile that was published last October in which he recounted his time in office and chided some former colleagues, specifically former Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzTucker Carlson: Ruling class cares more about foreigners than their own people Fox's Kennedy chides Chaffetz on child migrants: 'I’m sure these mini rapists all have bombs strapped to their chests' After FBI cleared by IG report, GOP must reform itself MORE (R-Utah) and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanThe Hill's Morning Report — Russia furor grips Washington Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership Jordan interviewed in OSU investigation into alleged doctor's sex abuse MORE (R-Ohio).

Republicans have acknowledged they may face potential losses in November's midterms, and multiple polls have shown Democrats with steady leads on the generic ballot.

Democrats need to net 24 seats in order to take back control of the House.