Dems pledge to reduce 'perceived influence' of superdelegates

Dems pledge to reduce 'perceived influence' of superdelegates
© Greg Nash

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) voted Saturday to acknowledge a need to reduce the influence of so-called "superdelegates" in the presidential primaries, while a decision on specific changes to the role such delegates will play in the 2020 election won't come until this summer.

At the DNC's winter meeting, officials accepted language committing the party to reduce the "perceived influence" of superdelegates, the unelected delegates that are free to support any candidate for the party’s nomination.

During the 2016 Democratic convention, unpledged superdelegates made up roughly 15 percent of the total delegates that got to choose the party's presidential nominee and they overwhelmingly backed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE over Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE (I-Vt.).


The DNC said in the report adopted Saturday that its Rules and Bylaws Committee will present its final proposal to the full party later this year. The panel was given six months, starting in late December, to come up with specific actions it would take regarding superdelegates. 

DNC Chair Tom PerezThomas Edward PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE called the vote Saturday a "milestone."

"[T]he Democratic Party is stating loudly and clearly that the status quo will change," he said. "When our work is complete, our 2020 nomination process will be the most fair and transparent in the history of American presidential politics.”

Perez had told The Associated Press that officials "will improve the democratic process” before the 2020 elections. “If we’re going to win elections, you’ve got to earn the trust of voters, and many voters had a crisis of confidence in the Democratic Party.”

The DNC’s Rules and Bylaws Committee had been discussing a proposal drafted by the Unity Reform Commission that was created after the 2016 primary battle. The commission had said they wanted the number of superdelegates reduced by 60 percent, but the Rules and Bylaws Committee suggested it might do even more.

During the 2016 election, supporters of Sanders argued that superdelegates allowed Clinton to get early endorsements and develop an early lead before the primaries or caucuses even began.

There are DNC members who want to remove superdelegates from the Democratic Convention’s first ballot altogether, allowing the candidate with the majority of pledged delegates earned through the primaries and caucuses to win the nomination.

Other DNC members believe they have earned their uncommitted vote through years of participation in the party.

Any proposal to change the power of superdelegates would need two-thirds support from the DNC’s 447 members to pass.

The committee has until June 2018 to complete its work, "which includes the crafting of any rules, bylaws, or charter amendments necessary to implement the major reforms agreed upon," according to a DNC press release. Those measures will then go to the full DNC for consideration this summer.

– This story was updated at 4:05 p.m.