WHIP COUNT: House Democrats’ positions on Obama’s tax compromise

President Obama’s negotiated tax deal with congressional Republicans appears to have the votes in the Senate, but passage in the House will be far more difficult.

House Democrats, including leadership officials, have strongly criticized the compromise plan. In a major development, the House Democratic Caucus on Thursday rejected the tax deal negotiated between the White House and Senate Republicans.

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The non-binding vote was held during a closed-door meeting of the caucus. Democrats are demanding change to the accord.

Republicans, meanwhile, have praised it.

Assuming all but five House Republicans will vote “yes” — Reps. Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeLawmakers reintroduce measure to lift Cuba travel restrictions Majority of Senate supports Cuban tourism bill Montana GOP senator: Gianforte 'needs to apologize' MORE (R-Ariz.), Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzChaffetz doubles down on request for FBI memos Chaffetz on leaving Congress: 'At some point, you've got to get off this crazy train' Feinstein: Comey memos 'going to be turned over' MORE (R-Utah), Mike Pence (R-Ind.), Michele BachmannMichele Bachmann'Real Housewives' producer 'begging' Conway to join cast Ex-rep admires furs amid PETA inaugural gala Why Republicans took aim at an ethics watchdog MORE (R-Minn.) and Steve King (R-Iowa) have indicated they will likely vote against the deal — the White House needs 44 House Democrats to clear the plan through the lower chamber. In order to scuttle it, 213 Democrats will need to vote no.

But the problem for the White House is that House Democrats control the floor agenda, so there is no guarantee of floor action this month. The Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire Dec. 31.

Most of the “Firm No” votes have signed on to a letter written by Rep. Peter WelchPeter WelchFive roadblocks for Trump’s T infrastructure plan Hopes of bipartisanship fade amid Comey chaos Trump to continue paying ObamaCare subsidies MORE (D-Vt.) that opposes the president’s new proposal.

Please send any updates to Bob Cusack at bcusack@thehill.com.


LAST UPDATED ON DEC. 16 AT 3:51 p.m.

Firm or Likely No — Republicans (5)
Michele Bachmann (Minn.) — The outspoken legislator said on CNN that she opposes the deal, claiming it would raise taxes.
Jason Chaffetz (Utah) — May challenge Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchGOP leaders launch internal review into leak Insurers: GOP should keep pre-existing condition protections DOJ pitches agreements to solve international data warrant woes MORE (R-Utah) next year. Hatch supports the deal.
Jeff Flake (Ariz.) — Flake told The Daily Caller that he has major concerns about the size of the package.
Steve King (Iowa) — King said on Fox News he is a likely no.
Mike Pence (Ind.) — In an interview with Sean Hannity, Pence likened the package to "more stimulus."

Firm No — Democrats (72)
Joe Baca (Calif.) — Called it "bad policy," according to Redlands Daily.
Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerA unifying cause in Congress: animal protection House Dem seeks to create commission on 'presidential capacity' Medical marijuana supporters hopeful about government funding bill MORE (Ore.)
Judy Chu (Calif.)
Yvette Clarke (N.Y.)
James Clyburn (S.C.) — The majority whip is a firm no.
Steve Cohen (Tenn.)
John Conyers (Mich.) — Judiciary Committee chairman has been outspoken against the deal.
Elijah Cummings (Md.)
Danny Davis (Ill.)
Peter DeFazio (Ore.) — DeFazio is not shy in bucking White House; he opposed the stimulus.
Diana DeGette (Colo.) — Does not support "Bush tax cuts for the wealthy."
Bill Delahunt (Mass.) — Retiring from Congress.
Donna Edwards (Md.)
Keith Ellison (Minn.)
Anna Eshoo (Calif.) — Close friend of the Speaker.
Sam FarrSam FarrMedical marijuana supporters hopeful about government funding bill Marijuana advocates to give away free joints on Capitol Hill DEA decision against reclassifying marijuana ignores public opinion MORE (Calif.)
Bob Filner (Calif.) — One of several chairmen who will vote no.
Barney Frank (Mass.) — The Massachusetts lawmaker said on MSNBC Dec. 8 he “won’t vote for it,” but believes the deal will pass.
John GaramendiJohn GaramendiLawmakers urge debate on Afghanistan war Lawmakers sound alarm on space security North Korean tests augment calls for boosting missile defense systems MORE (Calif.)
Alan GraysonAlan GraysonThe Hill's 12:30 Report Why Republicans took aim at an ethics watchdog Could bipartisanship rise with Trump government? MORE (Fla.)
Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.) — Progressive leader in the House.
Luis GutierrezLuis GutierrezDems observe May Day as immigrant day of action DHS hires incense immigration supporters The Democratic Party playbook must change if liberals are to win the future MORE (Ill.) — This Illinois lawmaker has criticized Obama throughout 111th Congress.
Phil Hare (Ill.)
Alcee Hastings (Fla.)
Martin HeinrichMartin HeinrichIntel chief has not talked with Trump about reported disclosure of classified info Dem senator: 'One of our closest allies' expressed concern about intelligence sharing Dems seek damage assessment after Trump's meeting with Russians MORE (N.M.)
Maurice Hinchey (N.Y.)
Mazie HironoMazie HironoDem senator to undergo treatment for kidney cancer Dem lawmaker to Sessions: 'You are a racist and a liar' March for Science rallies draw huge crowds around US MORE (Hawaii)
Rush Holt (N.J.)
Jay Inslee (Wash.) — In an MSNBC interview, Inslee called for package to be significantly changed.
Jessie Jackson Jr. (Ill.)
Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson-LeeDonald Trump's plan to disenfranchise minority voters Dems ask Justice Department, FBI to 'preserve any and all files' on Comey firing Dem highlights emotional Kimmel monologue on House floor MORE (Texas)
Paul Kanjorski (Pa.)
Dennis Kucinich (Ohio) — A darling of the left, Kucinich voted yes on healthcare, but will vote no on taxes.
Barbara Lee (Calif.) — CBC chairwoman is a firm no.
John Lewis (Ga.)
Ben Luján (N.M.)
Stephen Lynch (Mass.) — Voted no on healthcare despite intense lobbying from White House.
Doris Matsui (Calif.)
Betty McCollum (Minn.)
Jim McDermottJim McDermottLobbying World Dem lawmaker: Israel's accusations start of 'war on the American government' Dem to Trump on House floor: ‘Stop tweeting’ MORE (Wash.)
Jim McGovern (Mass.)
Michael Michaud (Maine) — Has been outspoken against Obama’s efforts on trade.
George Miller (Calif.) — Pelosi confidant wants major alterations to package.
Jim MoranJim MoranTrump can help farmers by improving two-way trade with Cuba Former GOP House veterans panel chairman goes to K Street Former reps: Increase support to Ukraine to deter Russia MORE (Va.)
Jerrold Nadler (N.Y.)
Jim Oberstar (Minn.) — Another chairman who will vote no.
David Obey (Wis.) — Likened deal to "garbage," according to the National Journal.
John Olver (Mass.)
Donald Payne (N.J.) — "We want a fair deal," he said at a recent press conference.
Chellie Pingree (Maine)
Earl Pomeroy (N.D.) — One of the most conservative Dems on this list.
David Price (N.C.)
Tim Ryan (Ohio)
Linda Sanchez (Calif.)
Jan Schakowsky (Ill.)
Kurt Schrader (Ore.)
Bobby ScottBobby ScottOvernight Finance: Dems introduce minimum wage bill | Sanders clashes with Trump budget chief | Border tax proposal at death's door Sanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill Lawmakers unveil bill to combat Sessions' push for tougher sentences MORE (Va.) — Appeared at a press conference to criticize the deal.
Carol Shea-Porter (N.H.)
Brad Sherman (Calif.) — Has floated ideas to leadership on how to change the deal.
Adam SmithAdam SmithNo, Mr. President, you don't have the 'better ideas' on trade GOP chairman's Pentagon acquisition bill looks past ‘bright shiny objects’ Lawmakers move to step up defenses against North Korea MORE (Wash.)
Jackie Speier (Calif.)
Pete Stark (Calif.) — One of many California Dems who will vote no.
Betty Sutton (Ohio)
Bennie Thompson (Miss.) — Thompson chairs the Homeland Security Committee.
Mike Thompson (Calif.)
Paul Tonko (N.Y.)
Edolphus Towns (N.Y.) — Another chairman opposed to the president's proposal.
Anthony Weiner (N.Y.)
Peter Welch (Vt.) — Spearheaded the letter to rally House Dems to vote no.
Lynn Woolsey (Calif.) — Progressive leader in the House.
David Wu (Ore.)
John YarmuthJohn YarmuthOvernight Finance: GOP bill would leave 23M more uninsured, says CBO | Trump aides defend budget | Mnuchin asks for clean debt hike before August | Ryan says House could pass bill without border tax Mulvaney defends Trump budget before Congress Dem lawmaker: Time for new generation of leadership MORE (Ky.)

Leaning No (10)
Gary Ackerman (N.Y.)
G.K. ButterfieldG.K. ButterfieldVoting advocates notch win at Supreme Court Supreme Court strikes down NC districts as illegally based on race Dems once critical of Comey line up to denounce his firing MORE (N.C.)
Rosa DeLauro (Conn.)
John Larson (Conn.) — Called the proposal “troubling.”
Edward MarkeyEd MarkeyTrump's steps on Iran show cooperation with Congress is possible FCC votes to advance net neutrality repeal Senate Dems appeal to 'everyone who uses the internet' on net neutrality roll back MORE (Mass.)
Chris MurphyChris MurphySenate gears up for fight on Trump's 0B Saudi Arabia arms sale Dem rep jokes ‘body slammed’ reporter lucky GOP healthcare plan isn’t in place yet GOP senators distance themselves from House ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (Conn.) — Doesn’t favor tax breaks for the wealthy.
Richard Neal (Mass.)
Bill Pascrell (N.J.) —  Said this week he's leaning no.
Bart Stupak (Mich.)
Chris Van Hollen (Md.) — Dem leader said on MSNBC that the estate tax provision “makes it very, very difficult for me to support [the deal] in its current form.”

Firm Yes (44)
John Adler (N.J.)
Jason Altmire (Pa.)
John BarrowJohn BarrowOur democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech MORE (Ga.)
Sanford Bishop (Ga.)
Shelley Berkley (Nev.)
Dan Boren (Okla.)— One of the most conservative Democrats in the House.
Rick Boucher (Va.) — Boucher, who lost his reelection bid, is a yes, according to the Richmond Times-Dispatch.
Dennis Cardoza (Calif.) — Blue Dog Democrat says he supports the compromise.
Chris Carney (Pa.)
Gerry ConnollyGerry ConnollyDem rep: Abuse, violence against the press 'hallmarks in Trump era' House votes to target human traffickers with cash rewards Overnight Cybersecurity: DOJ names special counsel for Russia probe | NSA warned Microsoft about security flaw | House passes IT modernization bill MORE (Va.) — He barely won reelection and represents affluent Fairfax County.
Jim Cooper (Tenn.)
Henry Cuellar (Texas)
Lincoln Davis (Tenn.)
Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellySanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill Updated fuel regulations would modernize options at gas pumps Mnuchin mum as Dems press for answers on tax reform, Dodd-Frank MORE (Ind.)
Brad Ellsworth (Ind.)
Gabrielle Giffords (Ariz.)
Bart Gordon (Tenn.)
Jane Harman (Calif.) — Dislikes parts of it, but has embraced the package.
Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (S.D.)
Baron Hill (Ind.)
Jim Himes (Conn) — Represents affluent Fairfield County, is a firm yes.
Paul Hodes (N.H.)
Tim Holden (Pa.)
Patrick Kennedy (R.I.) — Kennedy retiring from Congress.
Daniel Lipinski (Ill.) — In a Dec. 15 statement, Lipinksi said, "During these tough economic times we cannot afford to raise taxes... ." 
Jim Marshall (Ga.)
Jim MathesonJim MathesonTrump's budget targets affordable, reliable power Work begins on T infrastructure plan New president, new Congress, new opportunity MORE (Utah)
Mike McIntyre (N.C.)
Walt Minnick (Idaho)
Mike McMahon (N.Y.)
Dennis Moore (Kan.)
Scott Murphy (N.Y.) — The good outweighs the bad, Murphy said, according to wnyt.com.
Glenn Nye (Va.)
Gary Peters (Mich.) — White House noted his backing in a press release.
Collin Peterson (Minn.)
Mike Ross (Ark.) — Frequently disagrees with party leadership. Says he plans to vote for it.
Steve Rothman (N.J.) — "For millions of unemployed Americans, this bill literally means food on their table."
Mark Schauer (Mich.) — White House touted his endorsement of the plan.
David Scott (Ga.)
Joe Sestak (Pa.) — Will do so reluctantly.
Heath Shuler (N.C.)
Harry Teague (N.M.)
Dina Titus (Nev.)
Charlie Wilson (Ohio)

Leaning Yes (5)
Tim BishopTim BishopDems separated by 29 votes in NY House primary Flint residents hire first K Street firm House moves to vote on .1T package; backup plan in place MORE (N.Y.)
Joe Courtney (Conn.)
Carolyn McCarthyCarolyn McCarthyWhy Congress needs an openly atheist member, now Lobbying World Lobbying world MORE (N.Y.)
Bill Owens (N.Y.)
Tim Walz (Minn.)


— Michael M. Gleeson, Russell Berman, Mike Lillis, Bob Cusack, Kevin Cullum, Hayleigh Colombo and Hannah Brenton contributed to this list.