WHIP COUNT: House Democrats’ positions on Obama’s tax compromise

President Obama’s negotiated tax deal with congressional Republicans appears to have the votes in the Senate, but passage in the House will be far more difficult.

House Democrats, including leadership officials, have strongly criticized the compromise plan. In a major development, the House Democratic Caucus on Thursday rejected the tax deal negotiated between the White House and Senate Republicans.

The non-binding vote was held during a closed-door meeting of the caucus. Democrats are demanding change to the accord.

Republicans, meanwhile, have praised it.

Assuming all but five House Republicans will vote “yes” — Reps. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSenate GOP: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed Trump prepared to hit China with B in annual tariffs: report White House, Democrats reject competing DACA offers MORE (R-Ariz.), Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzAmericans want to protect public lands, Congress should listen Chaffetz: Florida school shooting survivors 'need a belief in God and Jesus Christ' Chaffetz: 'Mind-boggling' that Trump would call out his own AG MORE (R-Utah), Mike Pence (R-Ind.), Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannBachmann won't run for Franken's Senate seat because she did not hear a 'call from God' Billboard from ‘God’ tells Michele Bachmann not to run for Senate Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota MORE (R-Minn.) and Steve King (R-Iowa) have indicated they will likely vote against the deal — the White House needs 44 House Democrats to clear the plan through the lower chamber. In order to scuttle it, 213 Democrats will need to vote no.

But the problem for the White House is that House Democrats control the floor agenda, so there is no guarantee of floor action this month. The Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire Dec. 31.

Most of the “Firm No” votes have signed on to a letter written by Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchSo-called ‘Dem’ ethanol bill has it all wrong Overnight Regulation: Trump officials block GOP governor from skirting ObamaCare rules | House eases pollution rules for some coal plants | Senate vote on Dodd-Frank changes delayed Dem bill would overhaul ethanol mandate MORE (D-Vt.) that opposes the president’s new proposal.

Please send any updates to Bob Cusack at bcusack@thehill.com.

LAST UPDATED ON DEC. 16 AT 3:51 p.m.

Firm or Likely No — Republicans (5)
Michele Bachmann (Minn.) — The outspoken legislator said on CNN that she opposes the deal, claiming it would raise taxes.
Jason Chaffetz (Utah) — May challenge Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchSenate GOP: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed Week ahead: Lawmakers scramble to avoid another shutdown Lighthizer set to testify before Senate Finance on trade next week MORE (R-Utah) next year. Hatch supports the deal.
Jeff Flake (Ariz.) — Flake told The Daily Caller that he has major concerns about the size of the package.
Steve King (Iowa) — King said on Fox News he is a likely no.
Mike Pence (Ind.) — In an interview with Sean Hannity, Pence likened the package to "more stimulus."

Firm No — Democrats (72)
Joe Baca (Calif.) — Called it "bad policy," according to Redlands Daily.
Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerWay to go, Ted Poe Lawmakers promote pet adoption at Paws for Luck 10 governors shaping the future of politics MORE (Ore.)
Judy Chu (Calif.)
Yvette Clarke (N.Y.)
James Clyburn (S.C.) — The majority whip is a firm no.
Steve Cohen (Tenn.)
John Conyers (Mich.) — Judiciary Committee chairman has been outspoken against the deal.
Elijah Cummings (Md.)
Danny Davis (Ill.)
Peter DeFazio (Ore.) — DeFazio is not shy in bucking White House; he opposed the stimulus.
Diana DeGette (Colo.) — Does not support "Bush tax cuts for the wealthy."
Bill Delahunt (Mass.) — Retiring from Congress.
Donna Edwards (Md.)
Keith Ellison (Minn.)
Anna Eshoo (Calif.) — Close friend of the Speaker.
Sam FarrSamuel (Sam) Sharon FarrMedical marijuana supporters hopeful about government funding bill Marijuana advocates to give away free joints on Capitol Hill DEA decision against reclassifying marijuana ignores public opinion MORE (Calif.)
Bob Filner (Calif.) — One of several chairmen who will vote no.
Barney Frank (Mass.) — The Massachusetts lawmaker said on MSNBC Dec. 8 he “won’t vote for it,” but believes the deal will pass.
John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiDem: Trump presidency 'very serious security threat' for US Trump infrastructure plan gets cold reception House GOP leaders scramble for budget votes MORE (Calif.)
Alan GraysonAlan Mark GraysonPolitiFact cancels Alan Grayson hire after backlash Eighth Franken accuser comes forward as Dems call for resignation Pennsylania Dems file ethics complaint against Rep. Barletta MORE (Fla.)
Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.) — Progressive leader in the House.
Luis GutierrezLuis Vicente GutierrezWATCH: Gutiérrez says ‘lonely’ Trump can cry on KKK’s shoulder over WH departures Read Trump's remarks at Gridiron dinner Why Puerto Rico cannot govern itself MORE (Ill.) — This Illinois lawmaker has criticized Obama throughout 111th Congress.
Phil Hare (Ill.)
Alcee Hastings (Fla.)
Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichDems release interactive maps to make case against GOP tax law CIA torture could stymie nominee Overnight Cybersecurity: Senators demand Trump detail cyber strategy | Election security bill faces hurdles | North Korea linked to new cyberattacks on Turkish financial sector MORE (N.M.)
Maurice Hinchey (N.Y.)
Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoZinke defends use of Japanese word: How could saying good morning 'be bad'? Duckworth on Zinke's improper use of Japanese: ‘Racism is not ok’ Zinke criticized for 'juvenile' comment at hearing MORE (Hawaii)
Rush Holt (N.J.)
Jay Inslee (Wash.) — In an MSNBC interview, Inslee called for package to be significantly changed.
Jessie Jackson Jr. (Ill.)
Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson Lee'Westworld' star tells lawmakers about rape in plea for assault victims NFL player who kneeled for national anthem tackles Capitol Hill 'externship' Former Comey aide grilled by House panel for over seven hours MORE (Texas)
Paul Kanjorski (Pa.)
Dennis Kucinich (Ohio) — A darling of the left, Kucinich voted yes on healthcare, but will vote no on taxes.
Barbara Lee (Calif.) — CBC chairwoman is a firm no.
John Lewis (Ga.)
Ben Luján (N.M.)
Stephen Lynch (Mass.) — Voted no on healthcare despite intense lobbying from White House.
Doris Matsui (Calif.)
Betty McCollum (Minn.)
Jim McDermottJames (Jim) Adelbert McDermottLobbying World Dem lawmaker: Israel's accusations start of 'war on the American government' Dem to Trump on House floor: ‘Stop tweeting’ MORE (Wash.)
Jim McGovern (Mass.)
Michael Michaud (Maine) — Has been outspoken against Obama’s efforts on trade.
George Miller (Calif.) — Pelosi confidant wants major alterations to package.
Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranDems face close polls in must-win Virginia Billionaire Trump donor hires lobbyists to help vets Lawmakers: Chaffetz has a point on housing stipend MORE (Va.)
Jerrold Nadler (N.Y.)
Jim Oberstar (Minn.) — Another chairman who will vote no.
David Obey (Wis.) — Likened deal to "garbage," according to the National Journal.
John Olver (Mass.)
Donald Payne (N.J.) — "We want a fair deal," he said at a recent press conference.
Chellie Pingree (Maine)
Earl Pomeroy (N.D.) — One of the most conservative Dems on this list.
David Price (N.C.)
Tim Ryan (Ohio)
Linda Sanchez (Calif.)
Jan Schakowsky (Ill.)
Kurt Schrader (Ore.)
Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottRyan, Pelosi name members to new budget and pension committees Overnight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand MORE (Va.) — Appeared at a press conference to criticize the deal.
Carol Shea-Porter (N.H.)
Brad Sherman (Calif.) — Has floated ideas to leadership on how to change the deal.
Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithAmerica cannot afford to be left behind on global development Congress, fight global poverty by modernizing our private-sector tools Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump unveils new sanctions on Russia | Feds say Russian hackers targeted US energy grid | NSA nominee sails through second confirmation hearing MORE (Wash.)
Jackie Speier (Calif.)
Pete Stark (Calif.) — One of many California Dems who will vote no.
Betty Sutton (Ohio)
Bennie Thompson (Miss.) — Thompson chairs the Homeland Security Committee.
Mike Thompson (Calif.)
Paul Tonko (N.Y.)
Edolphus Towns (N.Y.) — Another chairman opposed to the president's proposal.
Anthony Weiner (N.Y.)
Peter Welch (Vt.) — Spearheaded the letter to rally House Dems to vote no.
Lynn Woolsey (Calif.) — Progressive leader in the House.
David Wu (Ore.)
John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthRepublican health policy is destroying rural health care McConnell, Schumer tap colleagues to explore budget reform Democrats march toward single-payer health care MORE (Ky.)

Leaning No (10)
Gary Ackerman (N.Y.)
G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldSenate passes bill to end shutdown, sending it to House House Dem opposition mounts to budget deal Shutdown begins after Paul pushes back Senate vote MORE (N.C.)
Rosa DeLauro (Conn.)
John Larson (Conn.) — Called the proposal “troubling.”
Edward MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyCambridge Analytica: Five things to watch Overnight Defense: US 'deeply concerned' after Turkey takes Syrian city | Trump, Saudi crown prince to talk Russia | Saudi energy deal sparks concern Coalition presses Transportation Dept. for stricter oversight of driverless cars MORE (Mass.)
Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Congress moving to end US involvement in Yemen This week: Congress races to prevent third shutdown MORE (Conn.) — Doesn’t favor tax breaks for the wealthy.
Richard Neal (Mass.)
Bill Pascrell (N.J.) —  Said this week he's leaning no.
Bart Stupak (Mich.)
Chris Van Hollen (Md.) — Dem leader said on MSNBC that the estate tax provision “makes it very, very difficult for me to support [the deal] in its current form.”

Firm Yes (44)
John Adler (N.J.)
Jason Altmire (Pa.)
John BarrowJohn Jenkins BarrowOur democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech MORE (Ga.)
Sanford Bishop (Ga.)
Shelley Berkley (Nev.)
Dan Boren (Okla.)— One of the most conservative Democrats in the House.
Rick Boucher (Va.) — Boucher, who lost his reelection bid, is a yes, according to the Richmond Times-Dispatch.
Dennis Cardoza (Calif.) — Blue Dog Democrat says he supports the compromise.
Chris Carney (Pa.)
Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDem lawmaker: McCabe's firing part of conspiracy to undermine Mueller Dems float revoking congressional medal for Myanmar leader Time for the Pentagon to create a system to better track its spending MORE (Va.) — He barely won reelection and represents affluent Fairfax County.
Jim Cooper (Tenn.)
Henry Cuellar (Texas)
Lincoln Davis (Tenn.)
Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyDem super PAC launches ad defending Donnelly on taxes Republicans insist tax law will help in midterms GOP chairman: House won't vote on Senate bill to loosen Dodd-Frank unless senators negotiate MORE (Ind.)
Brad Ellsworth (Ind.)
Gabrielle Giffords (Ariz.)
Bart Gordon (Tenn.)
Jane Harman (Calif.) — Dislikes parts of it, but has embraced the package.
Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (S.D.)
Baron Hill (Ind.)
Jim Himes (Conn) — Represents affluent Fairfield County, is a firm yes.
Paul Hodes (N.H.)
Tim Holden (Pa.)
Patrick Kennedy (R.I.) — Kennedy retiring from Congress.
Daniel Lipinski (Ill.) — In a Dec. 15 statement, Lipinksi said, "During these tough economic times we cannot afford to raise taxes... ." 
Jim Marshall (Ga.)
Jim MathesonJames (Jim) David MathesonTrump's budget targets affordable, reliable power Work begins on T infrastructure plan New president, new Congress, new opportunity MORE (Utah)
Mike McIntyre (N.C.)
Walt Minnick (Idaho)
Mike McMahon (N.Y.)
Dennis Moore (Kan.)
Scott Murphy (N.Y.) — The good outweighs the bad, Murphy said, according to wnyt.com.
Glenn Nye (Va.)
Gary Peters (Mich.) — White House noted his backing in a press release.
Collin Peterson (Minn.)
Mike Ross (Ark.) — Frequently disagrees with party leadership. Says he plans to vote for it.
Steve Rothman (N.J.) — "For millions of unemployed Americans, this bill literally means food on their table."
Mark Schauer (Mich.) — White House touted his endorsement of the plan.
David Scott (Ga.)
Joe Sestak (Pa.) — Will do so reluctantly.
Heath Shuler (N.C.)
Harry Teague (N.M.)
Dina Titus (Nev.)
Charlie Wilson (Ohio)

Leaning Yes (5)
Tim BishopTimothy (Tim) Howard BishopDems separated by 29 votes in NY House primary Flint residents hire first K Street firm House moves to vote on .1T package; backup plan in place MORE (N.Y.)
Joe Courtney (Conn.)
Carolyn McCarthyCarolyn McCarthyWhy Congress needs an openly atheist member, now Lobbying World Lobbying world MORE (N.Y.)
Bill Owens (N.Y.)
Tim Walz (Minn.)

— Michael M. Gleeson, Russell Berman, Mike Lillis, Bob Cusack, Kevin Cullum, Hayleigh Colombo and Hannah Brenton contributed to this list.