GOP to tweak Boehner debt bill as leaders wrestle to secure more votes

Republican leaders will likely tweak Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerEXCLUSIVE: Pro-Hillary group takes 0K in banned donations Ryan: Benghazi report shows administration's failures Clinton can't escape Benghazi responsibility MORE’s (R-Ohio) debt-limit bill as they scramble into the night to win enough votes to send the legislation to the Senate.

Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) told reporters shortly before 10 p.m. that the leadership would likely send the legislation back to the House Rules Committee, indicating that it will be changed before it comes for a floor vote. The expected vote has been delayed by more than four hours as GOP leaders try to persuade recalcitrant members to back BoehnerJohn BoehnerEXCLUSIVE: Pro-Hillary group takes 0K in banned donations Ryan: Benghazi report shows administration's failures Clinton can't escape Benghazi responsibility MORE’s plan for a short-term increase in the debt ceiling combined with spending cuts.

The majority whip’s office told members they still expect a vote to occur Thursday night.

Throughout Thursday afternoon and evening, Republican lawmakers shuttled in and out of leadership offices. Some, like Rep. Louie GohmertLouie GohmertGOP rep: Democrats trying to 'take away people’s civil rights' House gun control sit-in stretches into second day GOP rep confronts sit-in Dems in fiery exchange MORE (R-Texas), said they remained resolutely opposed to Boehner’s bill, while other said they were undecided.

“I think we still have work to do, but we’re gaining,” Walden said.

GOP leaders continued to meet with their members after putting off plans for a vote around 6 p.m.

Laena Fallon, a spokeswoman for House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorLobbying world The Trail 2016: 11 hours, 800 pages, 0 changed minds Juan Williams: The capitulation of Paul Ryan MORE (R-Va.), said at the time that the vote would occur "a little bit later" than the original 6 p.m. slot. 

More than four hours later, it remained unclear when the vote would take place. 

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Twenty-five House Republicans either plan to vote no or are leaning no, according to The Hill’s whip count. Nearly three dozen more Republicans are publicly undecided, and 10 of them said or suggested on Thursday that they are still on the fence.

Thursday afternoon presented major setbacks to Boehner, who can only afford 23 defections if — as expected — every Democrat votes no. Rep. Tim ScottTim ScottTrump veepstakes in overdrive Police: 3 killed in Tel Aviv terrorist shooting GOP senators propose sending ISIS fighters to Gitmo MORE (R-S.C.) said on Fox News he is a no, Rep. Joe WilsonJoe WilsonGOP fears next Trump blowup House GOP urges Obama to drop veto threat against defense bill Overnight Cybersecurity: Fight over feds' hacking powers moves to Congress MORE (R-S.C.) said like other members in his state delegation he is a no, and Rep. Scott GarrettScott GarrettThe Trail 2016: Candidate tug-of-war Dem group slams NJ Republican for 'hateful agenda' Divided GOP to powwow on budget MORE (R-N.J.) said he is still leaning no.

The task is fast becoming mission impossible, where several members will need to change from no to yes. And all the undecideds have to break with Boehner.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidIowa poll: Clinton up 14 on Trump, Grassley in tight race with Dem Lynch meeting with Bill Clinton creates firestorm for email case The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Nev.) has said he will immediately move to table Boehner's bill if it passes the lower chamber. Every member of the Senate Democratic Caucus opposes it.

As the House was voting on a separate appropriations bill Thursday afternoon, Boehner shuttled a trio of undecided Republicans — Reps. Chuck Fleishmann (Tenn.), Tom McClintock (Calif.) and Bill Posey (Fla.) — into an office off the House floor for private meetings. Fleischmann subsequently said he will vote yes.

As Posey was leaving, Boehner opened the office door and gave him an enthusiastic handshake in view of a gaggle of reporters watching.

Rep. Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeGOP senator: Trump could lose Arizona McConnell quashes Senate effort on guns Bipartisan gun measure survives test vote MORE (R-Ariz.) told reporters he was still leaning no on the bill and questioned whether it would be the GOP’s last chance to influence the debt-limit debate. He speculated that the Senate could send Reid’s measure, which he said was similar to Boehner’s proposal, back to the House, and then the House could attach a clean balanced-budget amendment and send it back to the Senate. Such a move would put the ball back in the Senate’s court as Aug. 2 approaches, as well as pressure Democrats to accept a constitutional amendment they have supported in the past. Flake would not say whether he had met privately with Boehner.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump muddies GOP message on protecting the Constitution Libertarian looks for anti-Trump bump The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Mich.), a conservative who frequently votes against the leadership, said he remains opposed to the bill but acknowledged that party leaders had discussed compromises that could win him over. He would not disclose what those changes were and said he had not met personally with Boehner.

The 10 Republican members who indicated on Thursday they are undecided are:

Roscoe Bartlett (Md.), who later said he was leaning toward voting yes.
Mo BrooksMo BrooksGOP rep: Muslims want to 'kill every homosexual' in the US House GOP avoids debate over immigration in defense bill GOP rep. on 'Lucifer' remark: Boehner has ‘said much, much worse’ MORE (Ala.)
Trent FranksTrent FranksGOP rebuffs doctors on gun research House GOP considers options post-Orlando Indian leader touts US relations in Congress speech MORE (Ariz.)
Scott Garrett (N.J.)
Randy Hultgren (Ill.)
Timothy Johnson (Ill.)
Tom Marino (Pa.)
Jean Schmidt (Ohio)
Michael Turner (Ohio)
Tim Walberg (Mich.)

Unlike the others, Johnson's office declined to comment. The rest said their bosses were still mulling how to vote.

Republican members who did not return phone calls on Thursday include Reps. Joe Barton (Texas), Dan BenishekDan BenishekTea Party class reassesses record Michigan Republican to retire The Republicans who voted to withdraw from ISIS war MORE (Mich.), Dan Burton (Ind.) and John Duncan Jr. (Tenn.). All of these members have bucked their leaders at times on high-profile issues, most notably during the fiscal 2011 budget debate.

The problem for Boehner is that most of the no/leaning no votes on The Hill’s list can't be swayed. These include Reps. Michele BachmannMichele BachmannLobbying world Trump camp reassures pastors after abortion ruling Falwell faces flak for posing with Trump in front of Playboy MORE (Minn.), Ron Paul (Texas), Jim Jordan (Ohio), Louie Gohmert (Texas) and Steve King (Iowa.).

Franks played a key role in the 2003 Medicare drug vote, which was supposed to last 15 minutes. Leaders held the vote open for nearly three hours, and convinced Franks and then-Rep. Butch Otter (R-Idaho) to switch their no votes to yeses. The bill was subsequently signed into law by then-President George W. Bush, who was woken up to call Franks during the House vote.

—Erik Wasson contributed to this report.