Dems: Great speech, now walk the walk

Dems: Great speech, now walk the walk

Democratic lawmakers say that President Obama is great at delivering speeches, but they claim that if he is going to govern effectively, he must walk the walk and not just talk the talk.

Democratic members are clearly frustrated with what they perceive as Obama’s lack of follow-through on a range of issues.

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To get the White House’s legislative wish list through a divided Congress, Democratic members on Thursday said the president has to do a lot more. 

“He’s got to go out there and really exert presidential authority, over the Congress and over the government structure. And the extent to which he can is the extent he’ll be successful,” said Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinOvernight Cybersecurity: Kushner says no collusion, improper contacts with Russia | House poised to vote on Russia sanctions | U.S., Japan to beef up cyber cooperation Feinstein calls for Sessions to appear in front of Senate Judiciary Committee This week: ObamaCare repeal vote looms over Senate MORE (D-Calif.). 

“I don’t think just speeches do it,” she said. “You keep hammering away until it gets done.” 

Democratic lawmakers said Obama needs to be far more hands-on. They recommend that the president follow up his speech on Thursday with aggressive salesmanship on the phone to individual members of Congress and by campaigning in their home states and districts for his agenda. 

Sources say that the White House has heard this message from anxious Democratic lawmakers and that Obama has vowed to step it up.

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Bipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Dems press for paycheck fairness bill on Equal Pay Day MORE (D-Md.) on Thursday said, “I agree with Feinstein. I think we need to have what he campaigned on: ‘The fierce urgency of now.’ ”

Stumping in Wisconsin in February of 2008, Obama told an enthusiastic audience: “I believe there is such a thing as being too late, and that hour is almost upon us. Our nation is at war, our planet is in peril and the dream that so many generations have fought for feels like it’s slowly slipping away.”

Years later, some Democrats are disappointed with Obama’s record. 

There are still nearly 100,000 American troops in Afghanistan and 45,000 in Iraq. Obama never made a major push for cap-and-trade legislation to reduce global warming, and shocked environmentalists last week when he announced his administration would delay strict regulations to curb smog-causing emissions. 

And some are disappointed that he pivoted so quickly to a deficit-reduction agenda after passing the $825 billion economic stimulus in 2009, a package liberal economists thought was $300 billion to $400 billion too small. 

Many of them believe Obama has been strong-armed by congressional Republicans.

In August, Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) said he doubted the word “fight” is in Obama’s vocabulary and indicated the president might not win Oregon in 2012. Obama won the state in 2008 by 16 percentage points. 

Over the last several weeks, Obama has talked tough about taking on his critics. 

For example, during a Labor Day speech to union workers, Obama said, “We’re going to see if we’ve got some straight shooters in Congress. We’re going to see if congressional Republicans will put country before party. We’ll give them a plan, and then we’ll say, ‘Do you want to create jobs?’ ”

The impassioned speech won praise from Democrats in Congress who have been urging Obama for months to adopt a tougher tone.

Obama promised Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) on Tuesday he would do just that. 

“I told the president when I talked to him [Tuesday] that I thought his speech in Michigan … was tremendous, and I hope he keeps that same pattern of speaking,” Reid said Wednesday. 

“And he said he was going to. He said we’re in a new day here. And so I hope that’s the case,” Reid added. 

However, Obama didn’t mince words with congressional Republicans during the contentious debt-limit negotiations in June and July.

At one point, amid a stalemate, Obama told House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorSpecial interests hide behind vets on Independence Day What to watch for in Comey’s testimony Trump nominates two new DOD officials MORE (R-Va.), “Don’t call my bluff.”

 After a deal was subsequently struck, Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerSudan sanctions spur intense lobbying OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure A simple fix to encourage bipartisanship in the House MORE (R-Ohio) crowed that he got 98 percent of what he wanted, and Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanNew Dem message doesn’t mention Trump Intelligence authorization fails in House Overnight Finance: Dems roll out 'Better Deal' economic agenda | Regulators mull changes to 'Volcker Rule' | Gingrich, small biz launch tax cut campaign MORE (R-Wis.) said Republicans had indeed called Obama’s bluff.

Exasperated with the 2010 tax deal and the debt-limit accord of this summer, liberal Democrats have urged Obama not to compromise with Republicans over his proposals to spur job creation. 

“Sixteen percent of the American people are unemployed or underemployed. This is a huge crisis,” said Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNew Dem message doesn’t mention Trump Senate Dems launch talkathon ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Overnight Healthcare: Trump pressures GOP ahead of vote | McConnell urges Senate to start debate | Cornyn floats conference on House, Senate bills | Thune sees progress on Medicaid MORE (Vt.), an Independent who caucuses with Democrats. “Now is the time for bold and significant action to put millions of our people back to work.

“If the Republicans disagree, let him take the case to the American people. He will win that fight.” 

Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic Policy and Research, said Obama should never have relented from his push for economic stimulus. 

“He totally lost control of the debate. He said, ‘We’re now going to focus on deficit reduction.’ He knew the stimulus was too small,” said Baker. 

Robert Borosage, the co-director of the Campaign for America’s Future, said Obama gave “a great speech” at Georgetown University in 2009 about the need to make sustained investments in the economy. 

“He would have been well-advised to continue fighting on this line,” Borosage said. “He should have stayed on that line and kept fighting for jobs until we saw them. It’s really difficult when people don’t see recovery. He’s a relatively popular president with a great coalition behind him, but this economy would ruin any president.”