Boehner names GOP conferees on stalled Violence Against Women Act

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE (R-Ohio) on Monday named Republican negotiators on the long-stalled reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, hoping to launch a House-Senate conference committee two-and-a-half months after the House passed its version.

The Speaker’s announcement is the first sign of movement on the legislation in weeks, but whether it will lead to substantive action before the November elections is unclear. The House and Senate are just days away from a five-week congressional recess.

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“Completing work on legislation to renew and strengthen the Violence Against Women Act is critical in our efforts to combat domestic violence and sexual assault,” BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE said in a statement. “The law has broad, bipartisan support in both chambers, and I’m announcing our negotiators today in the hopes that we can begin to resolve the differences between the House and Senate bills.

"The House is ready and willing to begin those discussions," he continued, "and I would urge Senate Democrats to come to the table so this critical legislation can be sent to the president for his signature as soon as possible.”

In late April, the Senate passed a reauthorization of the bill with bipartisan support on a vote of 68-31. The House followed with its own bill three weeks later, but Senate leaders dismissed the lower chamber’s version as inadequate because it lacked specific measures for Native American, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and immigrant victims of domestic violence. A top Senate Democrat, Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDemocrats turn on Al Franken VA slashes program that helps homeless veterans obtain housing: report The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (Wash.), has said she would not compromise on those provisions.

House leaders have called on the Senate to fix its own bill because it raises revenue, and measures that raise revenue must originate in the House.

A House GOP leadership aide said that position has not changed.

“Given that the Senate-passed bill is unconstitutional, the best way to proceed is for the Senate to fix their mistake, and go to conference,” the aide said. “In light of the heated rhetoric from Senate Democrats on this issue, if they do not agree to go to conference, it will seem they are more interested in exploiting this issue for partisan gain than getting a bill done.”

A spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) did not immediately return a request for comment.

The House conferees that Boehner named are Reps. Sandy Adams (Fla.), the bill’s chief sponsor, Mary Bono Mack (Calif.), Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyTop intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father Overnight Cybersecurity: Panel pushes agencies on dropping Kaspersky software | NC county won't pay ransom to hackers | Lawmakers sound alarm over ISIS 'cyber caliphate' Flynn told associate Russia sanctions would be ‘ripped up’ early in Trump presidency MORE (S.C.), Nan Hayworth (N.Y.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersOvernight Finance: Trump calls for ObamaCare mandate repeal, cuts to top tax rate | Trump to visit Capitol Hill in tax reform push | CBO can't do full score before vote | Bipartisan Senate bill would ease Dodd-Frank rules Overnight Regulation: Bipartisan Senate bill would curb Dodd-Frank rules | Opioid testing rule for transport workers finalized | Google faces state antitrust probe | Dems want investigation into FCC chief Trump to visit Capitol Hill amid tax-reform push MORE (Wash.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate women: Rules on harassment must change Congress, here's a CO2-smart tax fix to protect, create jobs Women, Dems leading sexual harassment discussion in Congress: analysis MORE (W. Va.), James Sensenbrenner Jr. (Wis.), and Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (Texas).