Ryan silent on a second term as Speaker

Ryan silent on a second term as Speaker
© Cameron Lancaster

Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanRyan: Graham-Cassidy 'best, last chance' to repeal ObamaCare Ryan: Americans want to see Trump talking with Dem leaders Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (R-Wis.) refused to say on Sunday whether he wants to run for a second term as Speaker.

ADVERTISEMENT
He said he had been enjoying the position, which party leaders had to pressure him into taking in October, “more than I thought I would,” but said he wasn’t thinking about staying on after 2016.

“I just haven’t been thinking about it,” he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “I stepped into the breach, stepped up when I had a duty and an obligation to do so.

“I’m excited about the potential. I’m excited about the opportunity. I feel blessed and honored to have this position,” he added.

Ryan, who leaped the first major hurdle of his Speakership when Congress passed the government spending bill on Friday, said he had minimal say over what was included in the $1.1 trillion omnibus.

“I don’t like the process, but it is the process I inherited,” he said of budget deliberations. “Everybody knows that I walked into the Speakership seven weeks ago with this process already in place, with its cake already baked.”

Despite his dissatisfaction with many components of the legislation, he said conservatives could claim some victories.

“I went to work to make the best of this process to get some good wins for conservatives, like lifting the oil export ban for the first time in 40 years,” he said. “Getting permanency on tax policy. Getting some good riders about the IRS so the IRS can’t meddle in politics.

“So those are some wins we did get. But the point I would say is this is a process I inherited,” he added.

Ryan said the House would vote to defund both Planned Parenthood and ObamaCare as a first order of business when Congress returns in January.

"We will be able to get that on the president’s desk, because we found a way to get around the filibuster in the Senate,” he said.

“So we are more effective in our ObamaCare and Planned Parenthood policy, to zero those out. And that’s going to the president’s desk.”