GOP centrists won't force 'clean' CR vote

House Republicans who have said they are open to supporting a “clean” government funding bill are not interested in forcing a vote on such a measure. 

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Democrats have launched a discharge petition aimed at forcing a vote on legislation that would end the government shutdown. Two hundred and eighteen signatures are required to compel a roll call, and that looks unlikely any time soon.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerCameras go dark during House Democrats' sit-in Rubio flies with Obama on Air Force One to Orlando Juan Williams: The capitulation of Paul Ryan MORE (R-Ohio) has said a clean continuing resolution doesn’t have the votes to pass the House. President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidWeek ahead: Court watchers await abortion ruling; Zika fight heads to Senate This week: Zika, Puerto Rico fights loom ahead of recess Hispanic Caucus PAC looks to flex its muscles in 2016 MORE (D-Nev.) on Monday challenged BoehnerJohn BoehnerCameras go dark during House Democrats' sit-in Rubio flies with Obama on Air Force One to Orlando Juan Williams: The capitulation of Paul Ryan MORE to prove it by scheduling a vote.

The Hill on Monday contacted the more than two dozen House Republicans who publicly favor, or who have said they would consider voting for, a clean bill. Not one said they would join forces with the Democrats. The Hill worked off a whip list that The Washington Post has compiled.

Republican Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart (Fla.), Lou BarlettaLou BarlettaUnion leaders see no evidence of migration to Donald Trump Trump Jr. huddles with NRA officials, House Republicans Ryan, Trump set for showdown MORE (Pa.), Frank LoBiondo (N.J.), Devin Nunes (Calif.), Mike Simpson (Idaho), Dennis Ross (Fla.), Rob WittmanRob WittmanSupreme Court to review Virginia state voting districts Overnight Finance: Puerto Rico bill clears panel | IRS chief vows to finish term | Bill would require nominees to release tax returns House panel approves Puerto Rico debt relief MORE (Va.), Charlie Dent (Pa.), Peter King (N.Y.) and Tim GriffinTim GriffinTea Party class reassesses record Huckabee's daughter to run '16 campaign Lawmakers seek Purple Heart for victims of Little Rock shooting MORE (Ark.) clearly stated they would not sign the petition.

In an email, Griffin said, “Instead of negotiating in good faith, House Democrats are playing political games with a discharge petition. They are following the playbook of President Obama and Democratic Senate Leader Harry Reid, who wanted a government shutdown for political purposes.”

Simpson spokeswoman Nikki Watts said, “The answer is 'absolutely not.' ”

Barletta spokesman Tim Murtaugh said, “The congressman would not support a discharge petition. It’s parliamentary gamesmanship which stands no chance of succeeding.”

King made similar remarks over the weekend on “Fox News Sunday.”

Dent said on CNN he will not sign the discharge petition, saying the process takes too long.

But others kept the door open.

Philip Minardi, a spokesman for Rep. Erik Paulsen, said the Minnesota Republican would “consider anything that comes across his desk.”

Kori Walter, press secretary for Rep. Jim GerlachJim GerlachBig names free to lobby in 2016 Ex-Rep. Gerlach ditches K St. in return to campaign world Ex-Sen. Pryor heading to K Street MORE (R-Pa.), said, “The congressman is focused on working with his House colleagues on a bipartisan solution to get the federal government re-open and working for taxpayers again well in advance of any discharge petition arriving on the House floor for a vote.”

These House centrists have mulled various procedural options to end the shutdown, which is now in its seventh day. If they defected on a GOP funding bill or on a rule to bring a measure to the floor, it would fail — assuming all Democrats voted "no."

House GOP leaders strongly discourage their members to sign discharge petitions, which is seen as undercutting their authority.

Republican members who had not commented at press time for this article include Reps. Rodney Davis (Ill.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore Capito14 dead in West Virginia flooding Morgan Freeman comes to Capitol Hill to save the sharks Overnight Healthcare: GOP plan marks new phase in ObamaCare fight MORE (W.Va.), Mike Fitzpatrick (Pa.), Randy ForbesRandy ForbesGOP rep faces recount in close primary race Virginia GOP rep loses primary Supreme Court to review Virginia state voting districts MORE (Va.), Michael Grimm (N.Y.), Richard Hanna (N.Y.), Leonard Lance (N.J.), Pat Meehan (Pa.), Scott RigellScott RigellGun-control supporters plan next steps versus NRA House Republicans pushing gun control bill Overnight Regulation: Deadlocked court delivers blow to Obama immigration actions MORE (Va.),  Jon Runyan (N.J.), Frank WolfFrank WolfLobbying World Overnight Regulation: Supreme Court rejects GOP redistricting challenge Supreme Court rejects GOP challenge to Va. redistricting plan MORE (Va.), Steve WomackSteve WomackA fix for the well-intended ethanol flop House Dems interrupt votes with push for gun bill GOP lawmakers blast Obama for 'unprecedented' overreach MORE (Ark.) and Bill Young (Fla.).

All but three House Democrats have signed the discharge petition. The holdouts are Reps. John BarrowJohn BarrowDem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech The best and the worst of the midterms MORE (Ga.), Jim MathesonJim MathesonDems target Mia Love in must-win Utah House race Overnight Energy: Justices reject new challenge to air pollution rule Former Rep. Matheson to take reins of energy group MORE (Utah) and Mike McIntyre (N.C.).

Even if Democrats snare the required signatures soon, they would have to wait until the discharge petition ripens. That cannot happen until next week at the earliest.

—Mike Lillis, Mario Trujillo, Haley Bissegger, Patrick Mortiere and Julian Notaro contributed to this article, which was last updated at 5:01 p.m.