Pelosi: House GOP bill is 'decision to default'

House Democrats said Tuesday that Republicans would have to pass their latest budget proposal without any Democratic support after a meeting with President Obama at the White House.

"If they go on the path they're on, they'll need 100 percent Republican votes," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said, blasting the Republican plan as a "decision to default."

ADVERTISEMENT
Pelosi said that Democrats in the House stood "ready to supply the votes" on a bipartisan deal from the Senate, and that she remained "optimistic that there is a path to lift the debt ceiling in time."

But she said she was "disappointed that the House Republicans decided to sabotage or at least delay" the Senate's efforts.

Republican leaders hope to move on legislation that would reopen the government until Dec. 15 and raise the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. The bill would also include the full Vitter Amendment, which strips subsidies for lawmakers and their staffs to purchase health insurance, as well as a new restriction preventing the Treasury Department from so-called "extraordinary measures" to keep paying bills past the debt ceiling being hit.

Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said that the restrictions on the Treasury Department would be "very, very damaging" to the nation.

Obama and Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPaul Ryan sells out conservatives with healthcare surrender Senate about to enter 'nuclear option' death spiral Biden: I regret not being president MORE met for over an hour with Pelosi, Hoyer, and Reps. James Clyburn (S.C.), Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraPlanned Parenthood video makers face felony charges in California In California race, social justice wing of Democrats finally comes of age Calif. gov: 'We're not going to bring stupid lawsuits' over border wall MORE (Calif.), Joseph Crowley (N.Y.), Steve Israel (N.Y.), and Chris Van Hollen (Md.).

While Pelosi said she remained "optimistic that there is a path to lift the debt ceiling in time," she cautioned that a Republican pursuit of "extraneous matters" could disrupt that process.

"Time is of the essence," Pelosi said.

Van Hollen sad Republican leadership had allowed Tea Party members of the Republican caucus "to run the show."

"Reason will prevail once they recognize the House Republican proposal is not going to go anywhere at the end of the day," Van Hollen said.

Pelosi said that there were only two options with the GOP bill: it would pass the House and be amended by the Senate, or that it would fail, and the Senate would send back a bipartisan bill. Either way, Pelosi said, the result would be the same.

She said the proposal from BoehnerJohn BoehnerPaul Ryan sells out conservatives with healthcare surrender Matt Schlapp: 5 lessons Trump, Ryan must learn from healthcare debate Nunes rebuffs calls for recusal MORE was a last opportunity for the Tea Party members to "sow their oats."

"Once they've had that opportunity, then sanity will prevail," Pelosi said.

But, she cautioned, "the time is ticking."