GOP lawmaker: Roy Moore should drop out unless he can prove his innocence

GOP lawmaker: Roy Moore should drop out unless he can prove his innocence
© Greg Nash

Rep. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingNew York reps seek investigation into reported 9/11 scam artists Trump considering pardon for boxing legend after call from Sylvester Stallone Comey-Trump feud takes vicious turn MORE (R-N.Y.) on Friday said Republican Alabama Senate nominee Roy Moore should drop out of the special election race unless he is able to prove his innocence in the face of bombshell sexual misconduct allegations. 

"I would say unless he can prove his innocence, the burden is now on him within the next day or so, I believe he has to step down. He owes it to himself, he owes it to the state and and he owes it to the U.S. Senate," King said on MSNBC. 

His comments come one day after The Washington Post published a story with several women saying Moore initiated sexual relationships when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s. The youngest of Moore's accusers was 14 at the time.

The former state Supreme Court chief justice has vehemently denied the allegations, and soon after the Post story went online shot an email to supporters calling for donations to help fight them, a move to which King objected.

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"When you have this type of corroboration, it's a burden on him and the fact he's sending out fundraising appeals based on this to me is really, really bad form," King said. 

A slew of Senate Republicans, as well as the White House, have said Moore should step down if the allegations are true.

Some GOP leaders, including Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainManchin, Donnelly back Pompeo This week: Senate barrels toward showdown over Pompeo Romney forced into GOP primary for Utah Senate nomination MORE (Ariz.) and former presidential nominee Mitt Romney have called for him to bow out immediately.

Moore called the accusations "a desperate political attack by the National Democrat Party and the Washington Post." 

"The forces of evil are on the march in our country ... I have a duty to stand up and fight back against the forces of evil waging an all-out war on our conservative values," Moore wrote in an email on Thursday.  

Moore defeated sitting Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeGOP intensifies war against Blankenship in West Virginia Republicans fear Cochran replacement puts Senate seat at risk Mississippi is new headache for GOP in the South MORE in the GOP primary for the special election to replace Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Why does Scott Pruitt still have a job? DOJ announces M grant to cover costs associated with Parkland shooting ‘Morning Joe’ host: Trump tweeting during Barbara Bush funeral ‘insulting’ to US MORE as Alabama's junior senator. He is set to face Democrat Doug Jones on Dec. 12.