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House Intel panel subpoenas McCain associate over Trump dossier

The House Intelligence Committee has issued a subpoena to an associate of Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (R-Ariz.) over his connection with the controversial dossier containing unverified allegations about President TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE and his ties to Russia, The Hill confirmed on Wednesday.

Committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesFive key takeaways from the Russian indictments Shepard Smith: New Mueller indictments prove Russia probe is 'opposite of a hoax' Schiff: 'We're very close to reaching an agreement' with FBI on countermemo MORE (R-Calif.) wants to talk to David Kramer, a former State Department official and current senior director at the nonprofit McCain Institute, about his visit to London in November 2016, a source familiar with the matter confirmed. 

The Washington Examiner's Byron York first reported on the subpoena.

While in London, Kramer met with the dossier's author, former British spy Christopher Steele, at McCain's request, to view “the pre-election memoranda on a confidential basis,” according to court filings.

Kramer then flew back to the U.S. and delivered a copy of the memos to McCain, who then handed the documents to the FBI. 

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The subpoena for Kramer to appear before House investigators on Jan. 11 comes after he met with the panel earlier this month.

The dossier has long been a key interest of Republicans, who want to find out if its claims were used as the basis for a surveillance warrant on Trump campaign associates. 

Democrats, on the other hand, are interested to learn whether the allegations made against the president in the dossier are true.

Certain parts of the dossier have either been confirmed or proven false, while other parts of the memo compilation remain unverified.

The Democratic National Committee and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE's presidential campaign partly funded the dossier, created by the opposition research firm Fusion GPS.

Trump has resoundingly dismissed the memo as "fake." 

A spokeswoman for McCain's office did not immediately respond to requests for comment. 

— Updated: 4:44 p.m.