Pelosi, Dems accuse GOP of moving goal posts on DACA deal

Pelosi, Dems accuse GOP of moving goal posts on DACA deal
© Greg Nash
House Democrats are amplifying their concerns with an emerging immigration agreement, accusing President TrumpDonald John Trump20 weeks out from midterms, Dems and GOP brace for surprises Sessions responds to Nazi comparisons: 'They were keeping the Jews from leaving' Kim Jong Un to visit Beijing this week MORE and Republican leaders of moving the goal posts in the eleventh hour of the debate. 
 
Democrats are increasingly indignant that Republicans are insisting protections for the so-called Dreamers — immigrants brought to the country illegally as children — be combined not only with enhanced border security, but also two additional provisions: a reduction in family migration and a scaling back of the diversity visa program.
 
The top Democrats — Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDems must stop picking foxes to guard the financial hen house Schumer warns 'House moderates' against immigration compromise bill Trump knocks Schumer, touts North Korea summit in early morning tweet MORE (N.Y.) and Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Trump surprises with consumer agency pick On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump nominates budget official Kraninger for consumer chief | Senate votes to block Trump ZTE deal | Stocks fall on trade tensions | House panel moves to markup budget MORE (Calif.) — have claimed they reached an agreement with Trump in September that included the first two elements of the package but not the last pair. 
 
”The goal posts have moved,” said Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.). 
 
Senate negotiators — who have worked for months trying to secure a bipartisan deal protecting those eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program — said Thursday they’ve secured a preliminary deal. But the rising concern from Democrats in the lower chamber, combined with early pushback from the White House, could complicate the effort to get the package across the finish line. 
 
“I do not support diversity visas, the lottery, or any other ancillary issue that … has been in the past a part of a larger comprehensive immigration reform package,” said Rep. Joseph Crowley (N.Y.), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus.
 
Pelosi on Thursday said she’s optimistic that “a solution is in sight.” But she also voiced frustrations that the terms of the initial talks have changed, largely in favor of enforcement-minded Republicans.
 
“We, all along, were going along with what the president said: He supports the Dreamers … and he wants to have some border security,” Pelosi said Thursday during a press briefing in the Capitol. “Then this week it emerged that he wanted to change immigration policy [by] addressing family unification initiatives … and ending the diversity visa [program].
 
“People were finding out for the first time that there were communities that were affected by this very directly, and we have to address those concerns.”
 
Indeed, the changes have sparked a backlash from liberal Democrats, including some leaders and numerous members of the party’s influential minority caucuses.
 
Rep. G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth Butterfield'Diamond & Silk' offer chance for bipartisan push back on social media censorship Live coverage: Zuckerberg faces second day on Capitol Hill Senate passes bill to end shutdown, sending it to House MORE (D-N.C.), former head of the Congressional Black Caucus, said he’d likely oppose a DACA package that included sharp changes to the diversity visa program, which benefits countries with low numbers of immigrants to the United States, including many in Africa. 
 
“I’ve learned in this business that you don’t absolutely close the door on every possibility. But it’s pretty darn close to a deal-breaker,” Butterfield said.
 
Fueling the Congressional Black Caucus’s opposition is the sense among many members that the Republicans want to dismantle the diversity visa program, not out of national security concerns but for reasons related to race.
 
“I don’t think it’s as much related to national security as it is to reducing the number of immigrants of color — black immigrants — coming into the country,” Butterfield said. “I hope I’m wrong about that, but that’s what it seems to suggest."
 
Crowley is also pushing back against the emerging DACA legislation, arguing that anything outside the Dreamer protections should be debated later as part of a larger comprehensive immigration reform package.
 
“I will reserve my judgment on that when I see the bill itself, [but] I have strong opposition to including diversity visas and family unification — any changes to those laws — as it pertains to the passage of DACA. I don’t think it belongs here,” Crowley said Thursday. “This is being hoisted now at the last minute by the Republicans who don’t want to see anything passed.”
 
Complicating the debate, a group of conservative House Republicans introduced a DACA bill on Wednesday that won quick praise from Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Mark Sanford’s troubles did not begin with Trump NY Post blasts Trump, GOP over separating families at border MORE (R-Wis.), who suggested it will reach the floor in short order. 
 
“I think it is a good bill,” Ryan told reporters Thursday. “It's important that we start putting ideas on the table.”
 
Sponsored by Reps. Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Schumer warns 'House moderates' against immigration compromise bill The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Furor grows over child separation policy MORE (R-Va.), Michael McCaul (R-Texas), Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyDems seek to seize on data privacy as midterm issue Arizona GOP Senate candidate walks back past support for 'fringe' candidate Paul Nehlen Dem Senate super PAC reserves million in fall TV ads MORE (R-Ariz.), the GOP proposal is a wish list for conservative immigration hardliners, eliminating the diversity visa program, curbing family migration and reducing numbers of legal immigrants while providing new funding for a border wall and tougher interior enforcement. 
 
Pelosi pronounced the bill dead-on-arrival even in the House, where the Republicans enjoy a commanding majority. She predicted half of the Republicans would oppose it, along with all of the Democrats.
 
“Do you think Democrats are going to vote for that bill? That’s completely out of the question,” she said. “It has no prospect for success. Zero.”