GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

Members of Congress en route to West Virginia for the GOP retreat quickly moved to help the people in a garbage truck that collided with their train.

Several Republican lawmakers on board had medical training, according to sources.

Local reports and a GOP aide on the train said there was at least one fatality and one serious injury among the people who were in the truck.

Aides on the train or in contact with their bosses who were passengers said there did not appear to be any injuries among people onboard. Some passengers bumped heads or hit the floor, but no serious injuries were reported.


Photos from the scene showed that the truck storage detached from the passenger compartment entirely, with trash strewn all over the scene.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBernie Sanders to Trump: Firing Mueller 'an impeachable offense' Overnight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Ariz.) said on CNN that lawmakers helped secure one person on a stretcher.

“He was pretty bad off. I hope he survives,” Flake said.

Flake said paramedics tried to help the person in the truck who died, but they “couldn’t revive him.”

Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeCongress votes to expand deficit — and many in GOP are unhappy Overnight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate Top appropriators say they see no need to specify funding for gun research MORE (R-Okla.) also said on CNN that Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyGOP senators push tougher sentencing for synthetic opioid Reforming Medicaid’s drug discount program would be a real congressional achievement Here is a health care proposal that could actually work MORE (R-La.) and Reps. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessHouse passes 'right to try' drug bill Overnight Health Care: What to expect in omnibus | HIV expert to head CDC | Sessions issues memo on death penalty for drug cases Overnight Regulation: Senate passes Dodd-Frank rollback | SEC charges Theranos CEO with 'massive fraud' | Former Equifax exec charged with insider trading | FEC proposes changing digital ad rules MORE (R-Texas) and Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupThe Memo: Trump doubles down amid some GOP doubts Lawmakers dispute ‘vindication’ for Trump in Intel memo House Intelligence Dem: Use of Steele dossier in FISA application 'small and insignificant' MORE (R-Ohio) were among the lawmakers rushing to help.

"They were actually the first person on the scene as far as I could tell,” Cole said. “They were administering CPR to the folks who had been hurt in the crash."

It’s not the first that time Wenstrup, a former combat surgeon, applied his medical training during an emergency that occurred during his time as a member of Congress.

House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseHouse Republicans grumble about the 'worst process ever' House expected to vote on omnibus Thursday afternoon House poised to vote on .3T spending bill MORE (R-La.) credited Wenstrup with saving his life at the GOP congressional baseball practice shooting last June. Wenstrup applied a tourniquet on Scalise’s gunshot wound, which helped staunch the bleeding before he made it to the hospital for surgery.

Rep. Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryKeep wildlife off Endangered List with proactive conservation funding GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash We vowed to help persecuted religious minorities — it’s time to act MORE (R-Neb.), who was also on board the train, said the House chaplain, Patrick Conroy, was also on the train and went to be with the people injured.

“A number of members of Congress who are doctors tried to help,” Fortenberry added.

Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenHouse leaders to Zuckerberg: 'You are the right person to testify' on Cambridge Analytica scandal Overnight Tech: What we learned from Zuckerberg's media blitz | Opening arguments in AT&T-Time Warner trial | Trump plans new tariffs on China Overnight Cybersecurity: House Intel votes to release Russia report | House lawmakers demand Zuckerberg testify | Senators unveil updated election cyber bill MORE (R-Ore.) also noted on Twitter that while he and most other lawmakers were "fine" after the crash, his colleagues had rushed to help others involved in the accident.