Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care

Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care
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A bipartisan group of New York lawmakers called on White House budget director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyOn The Money: Trump rips Fed over rate hikes | Dems fume as consumer agency pick refuses to discuss border policy | Senate panel clears Trump IRS nominee Trump pick to head watchdog agency is who consumers need Dems fume as Trump's consumer bureau pick refuses to discuss role in border policy MORE to scrap a proposal in President TrumpDonald John TrumpNFL freezes policy barring players from protesting during anthem McConnell spokesman on Putin visit: 'There is no invitation from Congress' Petition urges University of Virginia not to hire Marc Short MORE's proposed budget plan they say could threaten the health treatment of 9/11 first responders. 

New York Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingWashington big names celebrate launch of Hill.TV The Hill's Morning Report — Trump denigrates NATO allies, floats 4 percent solution ‘Unmasking Antifa Act' includes 15-year prison term proposal MORE (R), Jerrold Nadler (D) and Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyA new urgency to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — GOP spars with FBI agent at tense hearing Washington big names celebrate launch of Hill.TV MORE (D) said they were "shocked and disturbed" by the proposal, which would see a realignment involving the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP).

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That program is currently housed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trump's 2019 budget proposal for NIOSH would move that agency into the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

That move could result in the shifting of employees from NIOSH to the NIH, impacting the 83,000 9/11 first responders who receive treatment and care from the World Trade Center Health Program.

"The proposal directly contradicts legislation Congress passed just three years ago to renew WTCHP for 75 years within NIOSH," the three lawmakers wrote in their letter to Mulvaney on Friday.

King, Nadler, and Maloney were the original sponsors of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Reauthorization Act, which works to provide health care and financial aid to 9/11's first responders. 

They said the budget proposal was made with no input from the 9/11 health-care community. 

"If you had spoken to us, or anyone in the 9/11 healthcare community, you would have understood that the World Trade Center Health Program is fully integrated with NIOSH and there are many shared NIOSH staff whose expertise would be lost if the WTCHP is pulled from NIOSH," the lawmakers said. 

"We also would have explained the amount of progress NIOSH has made in service delivery, all of which would be lost if WTCHP were removed from the institute."

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.