Moulton: Pa. House election shows Dems 'can compete and win everywhere'

Moulton: Pa. House election shows Dems 'can compete and win everywhere'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonMore Dems offer to hire McCabe McCabe is ‘considering all options’ after firing Democrats have shot at flipping the House if they can stay in the center MORE (D-Mass.) said the results in the Pennsylvania House special election showed that “Democrats can compete and win everywhere.”

Moulton, who campaigned for Democrat Conor Lamb in the race, said that “on paper, [Conor Lamb] shouldn't have stood a chance in this district.”

“Tonight we learned that Democrats can compete and win everywhere — and that every vote counts,” Moulton tweeted. “I look forward to serving in Congress with Conor when all the votes are counted.”



The Pennsylvania House election between Lamb and Republican Rick Saccone was declared too close to call Tuesday night, and absentee ballots will be counted into Wednesday to determine a winner.

However, the results are considered a warning sign for Republicans ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, after President TrumpDonald John TrumpLieu: There will be 'widespread civil unrest' if Trump fires Mueller Attorneys for Trump, Mueller hold face-to-face meeting to discuss potential interview topics: report Trump tariffs not helpful for nuclear talks, South Korea says MORE won the district by nearly 20 points in the 2016 election.

Moulton had backed Lamb, a fellow veteran, in the race and campaigned for the Democratic candidate in Pennsylvania last week.

Both men have also been critical of House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiFeehery: March Madness Without ranked voting, Pennsylvania's slim margins hide voters' preferences Dem leaders pull back from hard-line immigration demand MORE (D-Calif.), with Lamb promising not to vote for Pelosi during her next leadership bid.

As of late Tuesday, Lamb had 111,875 votes to Saccone’s 111,028 votes — a margin of 847 votes with nearly all of them counted. However, absentee votes from GOP-leaning areas have yet to be counted, and it's unclear if those ballots will make up the difference.