Pennsylvania Republican: GOP running into ‘hurricane-force’ headwinds

Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentWhite House officials expect short-term funding bill to avert shutdown Spending bill delay raises risk of partial government shutdown support GOP lawmaker: McCabe's firing ‘looks like retribution and a bit vindictive’ MORE (R-Pa.) on Wednesday warned Republicans that they are facing a "very serious headwind" going into this year's midterm elections.

In an interview with CNN's "New Day," Dent said Tuesday's too-close-to-call special election in Pennsylvania's 18th District, which voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpKoch-backed group launches six-figure ad buy against Heitkamp Anti-abortion Dem wins primary fight Lipinski holds slim lead in tough Illinois primary fight MORE by a 20-point margin in 2016, should be a serious red flag to the GOP. 


"I think most Republicans realize we're running into a very serious headwind, a hurricane-force wind," Dent said. "It's coming, and we have to be ready for it. Some of our members in the marginal districts, the swing districts, are better prepared for these fights, frankly, than some members in safer seats."

Dent went on to warn his fellow Republicans in traditionally red districts that Democrats' competitiveness in the 18th District means they are just as vulnerable as GOP members in swing districts.

"I tell you what, if you're a Republican member in a pretty safe seat, like this one was, that's where I'd be nervous because these members are not used to running in these types of competitive situations," he said.

"The marginal swing districts, they know they're in for a fight. It's these guys in these safer seats. I think this is a wake-up call for them."

In the 18th District race, to replace disgraced Rep. Tim MurphyTim MurphySamantha Bee: Dems smell ‘blood in the water’ after Pa. election New York Times calls Pa. House race for Dem Conor Lamb An upset, yes, but a short victory lap for Democrat Lamb in Pennsylvania MORE (R), Democratic candidate Conor Lamb declared victory over GOP state Rep. Rick Saccone late Tuesday night after vote counts showed him with a 641-vote lead with 100 percent of precincts reporting. But Saccone had not yet conceded as of Wednesday morning and could request a recount.

More than 1,000 absentee ballots remained uncounted and election officials said the race was too close to call heading into Wednesday morning.

Republicans spent more than $10 million in the final weeks of the campaign to try and hold on to the district, and a number of pundits looked at Lamb's performance Tuesday night as an indicator for possible Democratic performance in the upcoming midterm elections.

Democrats need a net gain of 24 seats in November to take back the majority in the House. In the Senate, Democrats need a net gain of two seats to take the majority.